BIOL368/F20:Class Journal Week 1

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Contents

Yaniv Maddahi

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • Personally, when hearing the term computer science I picture someone in the field of robots or engineering. I specifically think of sci-fi movies in which a rocket needs to be programmed, similar to someone working for SpaceX or a company of the sorts. Whether it be for a website, videogame, or new software development. Not necessarily in the field of biology.

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I imagine something similar comes to their minds. If I had to guess I would say they would picture this “geek” or “nerd” sitting behind a desk coding for a website or app. Or perhaps something very extreme as older generations do not consider computer science as common or as "simple" in the sense that it is now a common career choice. Thus, I imagine older relatives would find the term computer science very "futuristic"-y.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think younger generations are more exposed to technology and thus the term computer science. However, I would say they would picture computer science as being the field for developing new video games, apps, websites, and softwares.


Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term biology I think of studying the world and its constituent parts. I think of studying everything and what makes up the life around us. Starting from a single cell to a tree made up of billions, biology is all about breaking down and learning how the world works and lives around us.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • I think this is a hard question to answer because being a biologist, in my opinion, has different levels to it. On the basic level I would consider myself a biologist because I study biology, I’m fascinated by the topic, and oftentimes I take the initiative on my own to study and learn more about the world around me. That being said, I would not consider myself to be a biologist on the same level as some of my professors because the work they have done is at a much higher level than that of my own, as well as their levels of academic achievement and education.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter

1. What was the purpose of these readings?

  • I believe the purpose of these readings is to perhaps show us, as students, how vast the world of science truly is. The Denning articles emphasize the nature of the world being somewhat of a form of computing that dates farther back than the first computer and the use of computing as a career choice with the different subspecialties and fields to pursue. The Janovy article really brings out the true colors of biology and what being a biologist means. I think as a whole the purpose of these articles was to bring light on the nature of studying science and biology and how it might be a lot more encompassing than we initially thought.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

  • I resonated with the engineer the most. I resonated with the engineer because I too enjoy actually creating the products of success and getting things done on my own. Many times if a solution does not exist I enjoy making one. I am also a very tactile and physical person. I learn better in person and through touch. I enjoy physically creating the solutions to problems and using what I have around me in new ways.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • Coordination: I like to think of sports teams when I think of the word coordination. Coordination was described in the text as cooperation between entities and so when thinking of coordination and sports teams I like to think of the way all the different players contribute to the overall team. Each player has their individual strengths and weaknesses and so they all must work together to reach the greater goal.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • What I found to be the most interesting about the Janovy reading was the emphasis on the difference between “I do…..” and “I am……”. I really appreciated and resonated with the difference between the two. Oftentimes, having aspired to be a doctor my whole life, the distinction between pursuing a career based on passion compared to the desire to become wealthy was always brought up. I think the distinction brought upon by Janovy of wanting to be something as opposed to doing something is very important. It emphasizes an aspect of an internal and visceral desire to pursue and learn about the topic of interest. Even the emphasis on values by the author, in my opinion, helps to highlight this concept.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • To be a biologist is to have a specific view of the world, an intrinsic set of values, and a scope through which to observe the environment around us. It is to have a deeper passion of studying the world and wanting to learn more about it. To be a biologist is much more than to simply study biology, it is to have the inner passion to open your mind to learning about everything around you and to continue to study it. I would say I am not a biologist. While I do have a great passion for medicine and studying the human body, I believe I lack the values and desire to study the world that Janovy emphasizes in his text regarding biology. I believe I am studying biology and I may be doing the act of it but I am not being a biologist. Even more so, I believe the level Janovy describes is greater than we might believe and so I hope one day I can develop the attributes but as of now I do not believe I am a true biologist quite yet.

Yaniv Maddahi (talk) 21:16, 6 September 2020 (PDT)

Anna Horvath

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

1.When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind? When I hear the term computer science, I think of an individual sitting in front of a lot of monitors furiously typing away. I usually think of a very smart individual who knows how to code and create websites. To me, this term involves immense technological knowledge.

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds? When older relatives hear this term, I think they are thinking of something that is potentially out of their reach and difficult to master. I believe that many of my older relatives would be afraid of trying to learn this principal, as it is often seen as a very complicated field that relatively young generations are taking part in.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds? When younger individuals hear this term, they are possibly thinking of coding in general, or potentially newer video games. They likely think of this field as being very accessible to them and may already have some knowledge involving the principles.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

1.When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind? When I hear the term biology, I think of studying biodiversity and all that we see around us. I think it involves a lot of trying to better understand the world we live in. I think back to my education here at LMU and although I know a lot of biological principles I did not necessarily know before, I am still unaware of so many facets of this fascinating science.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not? I do consider myself a biologist, not just because I have studied it for three years, but also because I teach it to younger freshman in biology lab. I have had the opportunity to conduct applied ecology research, conduct experiments, and learn many new biological techniques here at LMU. Through my education, I have started better understanding these principles and hope to further my education in graduate school.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

1.What was the purpose of these readings? The purpose of these readings is to tie together in our understanding the many overlaps between biology and computer science. These are oftentimes thought of as having little overlap. However, people’s definitions of both biologists and computer scientists are often very limited. They do not consider the constantly evolving nature of either field. Both of these principles are linked in nature by their desire to discover more of the world.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most? The voice of The Scientist appealed to me the most. They have a background in working with biology and were able to successfully apply this work to computation. Working with Dr. Willette and doing applied ecology has shown me some methods of how this work can be applied in a biological context.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life. I used the principle of Locality (Recollection) this past semester and into the summer while studying for my MCAT. My brain was filled with a lot of information about a variety of different topics, but I was able to organize them in a way that I could recall what exactly was needed as I read a passage.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading? I found the topic Janovy discusses of new students entering college with biology as their major without the mindset of seeking the truth to be interesting. He mentions that seeking the truth is a fundamental part of biology, without which they will not become proper biologists. I like his perspective on asking questions being an integral part of science.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not? To be a biologist means to ask questions about the world that we observe around us. They must be willing to have a sense of self-recognition, in which they acknowledge themselves as biologists. In order to be a biologist, one must be inquisitive and aware of the world around you. Following the examples given by Janovy, I do consider myself to be a biologist. I try my best to understand the world around me by integrating what I learn in my classes with outside research on topics that interest me. I hope to further my career as a biologist by going to medical school and developing my knowledge.

Anna Horvath (talk) 13:13, 7 September 2020 (PDT)

Owen Dailey

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term computer science, I think of the popular programming languages (Python, C++, JavaScript, and HTML) that exist. I also think of my AP Computer Science class that I was enrolled in as a sophomore in high school.

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • When older relatives and friends hear the term computer science, I believe they think of the I.T. service desk at Best Buy. They probably associate computer science with complicated computer jargon that is known by most of the younger generation.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • When younger relatives and friends hear the term computer science, I believe they think of an increasingly practical skill to learn/know. As video games, social media, and computers become increasingly integrated into society, I believe many younger people view computer science as a valuable feature of the modern world.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term biology, I think of the study of life; furthermore, I think of an important set of skills (critical thinking, communication, and attention to detail) that are associated with the biological field. Finally, I think of research, the aspect of biology that is continually advancing the field.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • I do consider myself a biologist. As stated in my answer to the previous question, I associate biology with an important set of skills (critical thinking, communication, and attention to detail). Through my time performing research, studying for various subjects within the field of biology, and attending seminars, I believe I have gained these skills; thus, I believe myself to be a biologist.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter

1. What was the purpose of these readings?

  • I believe the purpose of these readings was to illustrate the different applications of biology and computer science. As students in the S.T.E.M. field, we can often get tricked by the idea that there is a set path for biology majors and computer science majors. We fall into this false belief that we can only do a certain amount of things with a biology/computer science education when in reality there is an endless number of ways to use it. Biology and computer science contain values that are intrinsic to life, and the more we study these subjects, the more we will learn about life.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

  • The Engineer's voice appealed to me the most. It reminded me of a dental procedure called Digital Smile Design (DSD). The procedure blends computer science, 3D printing, and hand skills to recreate someone’s oral cavity. Being able to see computer science become a physical object is something I enjoy.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • One of the seven principles is “coordination (cooperation among networked entities). In team sports, one of my hobbies, coordination is a crucial part of a team’s success.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • I thought Janovy’s comparison of Darwin’s society to our modern society was interesting. Janovy states that “while Darwin’s contemporaries did science in an era when religion influenced the interpretation of data, [ours] do science in an overpopulated, weapons- and health-obsessed society that acts as if the world has an unlimited supply of fossil fuel” (Janovy 21). I think it’s an interesting observation that science is partially a product of the time.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • Being a biologist is to be a student of the world and a student of life itself. I do consider myself a biologist because I approach the world with curiosity, and I plan on having a career where I can contribute my knowledge to the world.

Owen R. Dailey (talk) 19:44, 8 September 2020 (PDT)


Nathan R. Beshai

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • Computer science, to me, is the software creating and editing that forms applications, websites, and anything we can see on a computer. Coding software is basically learning a new language that is used by coding applications like java and most computer editing. If I am correct a bug like the overheating of computers can even be computer science-based as it is the working of too much software that causes the overheating.

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • Depends on how old they are and their field of study but I would assume they would think it is somebody who studies computers. If they are not in the sciences I think they might think it is somebody who studies how to make computers more efficient and specifically quicker. They probably first think of an iPhone or Samsung where its the computer engineering side of putting hardware together to create a phone.

3. When your younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • It probably still depends on how young they are but I would assume they would associate it with video games. Also, I hear a lot of talk about hacking websites or hacking video games to get free stuff which they probably find as some attribute all computer science people can do or prevent people from doing. I would assume that they would also think about iPhones and Samsungs or Laptops and assume that computer scientists primarily build them.

Before reading the Janovy Chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear somebody say biology, I instantly think the study of life. I also think about the research and the variety of it out there. I also think about the cells in plants, bacteria, and humans and how they are all related.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • When I first read the question I initially thought no but then I thought about the term study of life and changed my mind. I guess by that qualification somebody who studies any aspect of life and makes observations is a biologist. Somebody who might have not had any biology education and enjoys bird watching and listening to their calls would even be considered biology.

After reading the Denning articles and Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

1. What was the purpose of these readings?

  • The purpose of these readings is to show that often the perceptions we have on certain fields are sometimes not complete or a full picture. In the chapter by Janovy, he illustrates that if we know all the processes like transcription and translation but do not have the tools to look out into the world and to become attached to living organisms it will be difficult to become a biologist. Likewise, in the Denning articles, he states that computer science requires as much natural information processes as artificial information processes. Meaning that computing revolves around natural information and not only process on a screen. I think another purpose of the readings is to show how intertwined computer science and biology could become and needs to become. In the chapter by Janovy, he states an example where a hundred years ago scientists would have laughed at the question of how DNA replication is regulated because they didn't understand it out of a lack of the technology to observe it. This struck me because it shows how without programs to study all the genes and DNA nucleotides, biologists could never get a bigger picture of what's going on in DNA replication and transcription.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

  • Currently, if I'm being honest, the voice of the user resonates with me because I love getting my hands on new technology and apps that might increase my productivity or learning. However, I do wish to resonate with the scientist because I tend to ask myself a lot of "what if..." questions and hope to someday have a way to test questions I ask about the world and to increase my knowledge about nature.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • Hierarchal aggregation reminds me of when there are large companies that are being split from a buyout or in trust into smaller entities. A recent example of this is T-mobile buying out Sprint. This resulted in the purchasing of Sprint's cell towers, stores, and other entities. If T-mobile did not want the stores they could have just purchased the towers and name and left the real estate of the stores to the previous owners of Sprint.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • I really like how he brought up biology values and how so many students shy away from answering them. In my statistics class, we have been talking about how scientists have not been able to repeat previous experiments because the original experiment did not report all the data or they altered it. Values in biology are essential because we are studying life and it is essential to have values when taking care of an animal or designing an experiment.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • To be a biologist is a dedication to the study of life and to have an attachment to all living organisms. This dedication will help preserve and know more about life and aims to not only focus on human life but all life. I still do consider myself to be a biologist as I hope to help preserve life through my future medical career. In the healthcare field, there is still research and controlled experiments going on which increases the information we know about human biology. Even in college, we have a responsibility as biology majors to study life and to study ways we, as humans, can execute our responsibility to all life.

Nathan R. Beshai (talk) 22:39, 8 September 2020 (PDT)

Aiden Burnett

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

1 When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • I think of the act of writing code & research into how to engineer coding languages/methods that are more efficient. Broadly I think of being able to use technology to accomplish things that would otherwise be too complicated or labor intensive.

2 When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think that my older relatives would imagine Apple and Microsoft, advances in technology they witnessed, and maybe the idea of 1s and 0s if not binary code.

3 When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • My younger relatives would probably imagine hacking, programming, and "the stuff that makes video games work".

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

1 When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • The color green, complex ecosystems with many varying niches and occupants, trophic levels, the properties of life (metabolism, heredity, etc).

2 Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • I consider myself as having been a lifelong biologist, interested in observing plants & animals from a young age. I think that my claim to the title is further validated by my ongoing education on the subject.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

1 What was the purpose of these readings?

  • The purpose of these readings was the dispel negative perceptions of Biology or Computer Science before starting this course. We are intended to go in with a mindset that we can engage with these sciences (not as outsiders) and that they overlap more than we may have assumed

2 Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

  • Naturally "the scientist" appealed to me (I say this because of my career interests). I identify with their curiosity and fascination with knowledge.

3 Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • My initial thought is to compare the hereditary information stored in DNA to the principles of Compression & Recollection. In case this is too "computer science"-y, I'll also note that coordination/choosing takes place whenever one orders a meal..

4 What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • "The idea that science classes must deal only with observations, interpretations, and experimental design is delusional." (Janovy page 7) I found this to be really interesting as the divide between science and the humanities has always seemed like a necessary and beneficial one to me. I began pursuing my Bioethics minor because I enjoy learning about the latter and was not exposed to them enough as a Biology major. This is not to say that I agree or disagree with this assertion, but that I had not really considered it before.

5 What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • Some of what it means to be a biologist includes an inate curiosity & perception that the world is full of potential investigations, the understanding that humans are part of nature, and the ability to see and appreciate the life around you. Not for the profit that can be gained from living things but because of the inherent importance and complexity of life.

Fatimah Alghanem

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term computer science what comes to my mind is my best friend who's finishing her bachelor's degree in computer science. I also think about coding, and how websites and apps are made.

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think when older relatives/ friends hear the term computer science what comes to their mind is computers, challenge, and also the technology they saw improving by the years. I also think they don't know the exact meaning of it.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think that when younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science what comes to their mind is their lifestyle in which computer science is a big part of it.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • when I hear the term biology what I think of is how basically anything in our world could be related to biology. For example, the COVID-19 pandemic could be related to biology, also the overheating of the world could be related to biology too.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • yes I consider myself a biologist because I have majored in it and I'm better informed in biology than in any field. I am also experienced in biology too therefore I consider myself a biologist.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

1. What was the purpose of these readings?

  • The purpose of these readings was to show the different aspects of computer science and biology. it also shows the relationship between the two. Additionally, the reading expands the reader's knowledge about biology and computer science as it shows how they complete one another.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seems to appeal to you the most?

  • I think that the Scientist Voice appeal to me the most.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • I could relate to Recollection as I use it in my daily life. Everyday information is stored in my brain, sometimes it's as simple as where I parked my car and I use recollection to remember that kind of information.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • The most interesting thing I read in the Janovy reading is when it discussed what biologists add to life and the meaning they add to it. I like how it perceived both a biologist that would work in a high school and one that studies frogs in the south in a similar way even though its two different jobs. It made me understand the sense of community between biologists and scientists in general.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • To be a biologist is to study living organisms at a high level and make meaning of the finding to help people, communities, and the world in general.I don't consider myself a biologist yet, I think that in order for me to consider myself a biologist I would have to be doing something that benefits others through biology like researching something that would be helpful and so on. I also think I need more knowledge and I need to study biology more In order to consider myself a biologist.

Kam Taghizadeh

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term computer science, I think of those who spend their hours in front of a computer, coding various things for practical use.I also think about software programs such as python, and how coding is a very useful skill to know.

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think they view computer science as a very hard concept to grasp, because my older relatives and friends are not tech savvy.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think younger relatives are more equipped with knowledge regarding technology in comparison to older generations, so they may see it as an important skill to learn, especially since technology is limitless and growing faster than ever right now. Computer science for them, including my own generation, may be essential for our future careers.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term biology, I think about the fundamental aspects of life which allow organisms to live. Without biology, no organism would exist on this planet, so it is crucial to learn about. I also think about the many classes I've taken at LMU regarding various concepts of biology, and I wouldn't be the person I am today without them.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • I consider myself a student of biology, but not a biologist, because I do not have the same expertise or training as a lot of my professors do. I understand much more biology than the average person, however, I would only consider myself a biologist if I were doing research in a particular field of biology. However, I know that I have immense knowledge regarding biology, which will help me in my career as a doctor.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter

1. What was the purpose of these readings?

  • The purpose of these readings is to teach the reader about the numerous components that make up computer science. It is also taught through the Denning articles that computer science is not just the study of artificial things, but natural things as well. For instance, the articles explain how the core of nature is computing, and not mathematics. For instance, the DNA within our cells code for our phenotypic traits, and this is just one example of how nature utilizes computer science. Rather than computer science first being affiliated with computers, it was affiliated with nature long before the invention of a computer. The Janovy chapter serves to shed light on the values that biologists hold within their careers. Although it may seem that what a biologist researches may not apply to one's everyday life, it is still a part of the bigger picture of this world.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

  • The scientist appeals to me the most, as I am a biology student and I have immersed myself within the field throughout my college career. Also, my dad is a doctor, so all of my life I have been exposed to the ways in which systems within our bodies work.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • Communication is the principle that resonates with me the most, because it is crucial to have within the human experience. For instance, the simple fact that I can talk to my parents regarding my day is something to cherish.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • The most interesting part about the Janovy reading is when he analyzes the life of his colleague who studied frogs in South America. Although it seemed like his work was of little value to the mom he was talking to at the game, he could see the way his colleague's research added to the greater picture of the world. This made me realize that everyone contributes to the world in their own way, and nothing is of little value.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • To be a biologist means to have passion for learning, and a general curiosity about the way biological processes work. Being a biologist also means that one should live by their values, and contribute to the world in a positive way. It is not just the act of studying biology that makes one a biologist, because they have not added anything of value to the world yet. Once one is able to study a particular phenomenon or thing, is when they can contribute to something bigger than themselves. This is why I still do not believe that I am a biologist, because I have not taken the time to do any research of my own. In my eyes, I am simply performing the act of biology by studying it, but I am not an actual biologist.

Kam Taghizadeh (talk) 22:13, 9 September 2020 (PDT)

Ian R. Wright

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • Utility. I often wonder how I can use computer power in my future professional fields. Should I learn programming languages? What software should I become familiar with to best equip myself for scientific academia?

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I'd imagine my dad would think about processors and number crunching programs. He has to deal with a lot of data for his profession. My mother would most likely think of educational programs because she is an educator and an avid supporter of computer education. My father's father would most likely think about all the intricacies of hardware engineering. He was a laser developer and a professor of robotics before his retirement so he's very experienced with computer hardware. My other grandfather's thoughts, however, would probably not reach past the point of his flip phone. He never had a use for computers and probably never will.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • It depends on the friend. I have a younger friend who knows at least 5 coding languages. On the other hand, some other younger friends would start giving dissertations on how to best defeat the Ender Dragon in Minecraft.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • I think of the vasts amounts of knowledge that are yet to be known by me and the even larger pool of knowledge that is yet to be known by humankind. Biology is such an interdisciplinary science in my mind that even astronomy would be applicable. Also, similar to when I hear the term computer science, I think of utility when I hear 'biology'. With the knowledge gained through the study of life, we are gaining access to an immense toolbox that can do things like make our crops grow better, heal damaged landscapes, even make other planets hospitable.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • Yes. I ask questions, I make observations, and I am curious about the functions of living beings and how they interact with their environment. Biology is a study and a pursuit. I am studying and pursuing.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

1. What was the purpose of these readings?

The Denning readings were intended to expand the theory of computer science and computation into a more interdisciplinary concept. Both of the articles effectively instilled confidence that computation and information processing is an integral aspect of my academic field. The Janovy reading seemed to be intended to allow us to adopt the identity of biologist. To be something gives us so much more power to be creative in the things we do. The chapter was very comforting. I feel that my biological paradigm has been validated by a professional biologist.

2. Which of the voices in Voices of Computing seem to appeal to you the most?

The Engineer and The User appeal to me the most. The Engineer appealed to me because its voice was goal oriented and practical. If there is a problem, then the job of the engineer is to build a solution. The User reminded me of myself, not only because I am a run-of-the-mill, garden-variety gamer, but also because I use computational programs as an amateur. I use tools that are applicable to my field with very little knowledge on how those tools were developed.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from Computing is a Natural Science to something as "non-computer-science-y" as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life

Recollection is a very important principle to a student. We are tasked in nearly every assignment to unearth information, ideas, and products that were created by people who may have passed long before we were born. The ability to reach back into a log of information and pull knowledge back into the consciousness of modern humanity is a very important yet fragile thing.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

I was interested in so many things Janovy was writing about. My absolute favorite quote to pull out of this reading was, "A fundamental property of a mind that asks the right questions is that it not only sees complexity of structure and function within organisms but also sees how this complexity is superimposed on uniformity." I will keep a screenshot of that quote on my desktop. I was also stricken by Janovy's description of the "right question". The right question is one that can be answered using devised and practical techniques, that serve as analogs for other questions, and generate additional questions. I have been struggling since sophomore year with a deep and torturous desire to ask and answer biological questions. The struggle comes from the fact that I do not have the time or resources to go about answering these questions. I am only an undergraduate. I do not have free access to the tools required to answer such questions. Janovy's comment on the "right question" is that I need to be more practical with the questions I ask. I need to more truthfully evaluate my resources and ask the easier questions. Save the big ones for if I ever get that PhD.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

To be a biologist is to see like a biologist. The world-view of a biologist is that which is in constant consideration of the living functions and interactions in the living world. It is a mental attachment to the world of living organisms. A person becomes a biologist when they identify as one. I do consider myself a biologist. Like the graduate student Janovy had pizza with, I look at birds when I walk through campus. Not even in a metaphorical sense. Once a person develops an interest in birds, that person nearly inevitably falls into the rabbit hole of biology. Birds have the strange capability to reveal the interconnectedness of the natural world from the microscopic to the global scale. There's a reason birders have a reputation of being just a little bit weird. It's because ornithology is an obsession. Anyway, ever since learning the fundamentals of evolution, genetics, and cellular function, my paradigm has shifted to constantly be that of a biologist. Janovy said the complexities are superimposed on uniformity. It works the other way around too. Once the uniformities are illuminated, the complexities cannot cease to reveal themselves.

Ian R. Wright (talk) 14:37, 10 September 2020 (PDT)

JT Correy

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term “computer science” I think of people that are way smarter than I am and coding. I have taken a couple codding classes (one in Java and one in R) and was not overly successful. I understand the basics of both, but the people who have taught/helped me along seem to be on another level. My younger brother is a sophomore in high school this fall and not only helped me learn R over the summer but taught other high schoolers a different language. He is able to sit at his computer for hours and grind away, and it is just not something that I feel confident in understanding.

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I would image that the older generation problems thinks a lot of different things depending on what they have been exposed to. I know that my grandparents are scared of computers (like Alexa and Siri) taking over the world. But my parents love computer science and are extremely supportive of my younger brother and his interest in it. I have conversations with them about computer science and AI and they seem excited for the benefits but also slightly timid as to how advanced things will get and potential problems they could cause.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I’m pretty sure when my younger brother thinks of computer science he is thinking of taking over the world. I can only really speak about his perspective as I don’t know that many other younger kids. He works for hours watching videos about coding as well as practicing coding himself. He is super interested in the mathematical applications. He definitely sees computers as a resource to enable his success. For example, rather than spending several hours doing his calculus homework, he will make a code in a much shorter time frame that will solve all the problems for him.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions

1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear “biology” I think of LSB. I didn’t really take any biology courses before college, so most of my time studying/learning biology has been in LSB. In thinking of LSB general biology lab comes to mind. Everything from microbes to starfish is covered in the class, and thus I think of a really broad range of living things. However, cells, DNA, and basic foundations of life do not immediately come to mind. I think this is likely because I feel less confident in those areas. After being a TA for bio 111 and 112 I feel like I have a very good grasp on the topics covered and thus they are what come to mind when I hear “biology”.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • I do not consider myself a biologist, I consider myself someone who is interested in biology. I would consider myself a biologist after I graduate with a degree in biology. I certainly know more about biology then most other areas of study, but I think that it is important to ground oneself in actions rather than intentions. Essentially, I don’t think I have earned the title “biologist” yet because I don’t think you can declare yourself something without evidence. Just as someone may claim they are part of the police/peace-keeping force, they really have no grounding to that statement until they go through the proper and established training, and claiming that title typically does not help anyone.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions

1. What was the purpose of these readings?

  • I think the purpose of these reading was to broaden our understanding of both computer science and biology. In the two articles about computer science, Denning urges the reader to think about computer science as more than just coding. I t is important to remember not only everything that goes into computer science, but also everything that computer science goes into. After reading the articles I definitely fell more thankful for the teams and companies who produce computer science products, as they are an integral part of almost every aspect of my life. The Janovy reading was intended to push the boundaries of what it means to be a biologist, as well as narrow it. It pushes the boundaries through claiming that anyone who thinks with life and organisms at the forefront of their thought process should be considered a biologist. But it narrows the field be elaborating on the idea that there really is not as many people who are biologist as it seems. All the people going into the biological field with the intention of making money or becoming famous rather than helping organisms should not be considered a true biologist.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

  • I think the engineer resonates with me the most. I come from a family with a civil engineer and an aerospace engineer, so I am pretty well acclimated in the engineering world. Part of the reason I love biology so much is because we can see what is going on; whether it is cell division or organ systems in a mammal, we can physically see and sometimes touch what we are studying. This is also true of the engineer. They are tasked with producing a project, rather than producing a concept.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • After reading about “hierarchical aggregation”, I immediately thought of government. Many people form towns, towns form counties, counties form states, and states form a country. The US can be looked bottom up like that, or top down. If a federal law is passed it affects everyone at every level of society. But a law can be passed in a state or county that only affects those residing in that area.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • I am not really sure that I agree with his views of someone not being a true biologist if they intentions are not solely to help organisms (like if they are in it for the money). I agree with him in the sense that I wish everyone had the best intentions, but I just don’t think that can be the case in our current society. Take athletes for example. Someone like Neymar (a premier soccer player) chose to go to a team solely because they offered him a massive contract. Someone like Dwayne Wade (a hall of fame basketball player) was willing to take a pay cut to play on a team with some of his close friends. Is Dwayne Wade now more of an athlete because he acted not solely for money and fame? I think the answer is no, and the same concepts should be applied to biology. Just because someone is interested in making money, or something other than pure benefit to living things, should not make them any less of a biologist as long as they can produce similar results.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • I think that in Janovy’s view, to be a biologist means simple to think about life and organisms constantly and intensely. He gives the example of the two students looking at birds rather than their peers while they walk to class. I think this is a very interesting way of defining what a biologist is, and not one that I agree with. By Janovy’s definition, I would say yes, I am a biologist. I almost always think about other organisms while doing a given task. For example, whenever I eat something I think about the plant/animal and how eating this thing impacts the environment. Or going for a walk and seeing garbage and thinking that it is a shame not because it looks bad, but because that garbage will likely end up in the ocean and thus have profoundly negative impacts on an ecosystem.

Jcorrey (talk) 18:10, 9 September 2020 (PDT)

Taylor Makela

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions:

1.When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term computer science, I initially think about coding and computer software. Specifically, I think about the coding and engineering involved in created programs, apps, softwares, etc..

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think that when older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, they think about work done on previously existing software (i.e. excel, word, etc.), rather than the science involved in creating that program. My older relatives do not have a deep understanding of technology and the science behind it.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think that when younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, they think about apps and programs that they are familiar with. Younger generations grew up with technology so they have a lot of knowledge and natural abilities regarding the subject.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions:

1.When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term biology, I initially think of cells and how living organisms function. Due to my interest in medicine, I tend to gravitate towards thinking about cells and systems within the human body. I am fascinated by biology as a subject and I look forward to connecting my interest in biology to computer science.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • I do not think I have enough experience/education to consider myself a biologist. I think that once I gain more experience and graduate with my Bachelor's degree in biology, I will then be considered a biologist.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

1.What was the purpose of these readings?

  • The purpose of the Denning readings was to explain what computer science really is and what the different principles of computer science are. These articles also outlined the different ways that everyone uses/depicts computer science (i.e. the voices in the Voices of Computing article). On the other hand, the Janovy reading discussed what it means to really be a biologist and the importance of values.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

  • In the Voices of Computing article, the voice that appealed to me the most was the scientist because that is the voice that I relate to the most. Similarly to the scientist voice, I believe that programming and computer science is only possible because of scientific discoveries/knowledge. Additionally, just like the scientist voice, I love discovering new things about the world around us.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • As someone who grew up doing ballet, I am going to be applying the principle of evaluation to ballet - something very "non-computer-science"-y. When I did ballet, anytime we had an upcoming recital or competition, my instructor would have us run through our routines and would then evaluate our performance to see what we need to work on before our real performance. My instructor did not do this to pick on us, but rather to evaluate and plan how we would do on performance day, just like the evaluation principle in computer science.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • I found it very interesting when Janovy was talking about his numerous interactions with students who majored in biology and how most of the students were very similar. All of the students were quick to spit out facts and information that they had memorized, but had a more difficult time discussing values. I was also intrigued by Janovy's explanation for this pattern -- that the reason for this could be because of the structure of science classes and how there needs to be more emphasis on why these biological concepts are important to each student personally.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • I think that based on Janovy's values I would qualify as a biologist. I prioritize my values and genuine passion for biology and the natural world. The articles emphasize the importance of not only utilizing the sciences, but keeping the larger questions and values of the subject as the main goal. This specific criteria has allowed me to redefine myself as a biologist.

Taylor Makela (talk) 20:49, 9 September 2020 (PDT)


Nida Patel

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

1.When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term computer science I immediately correlate it to computer coding and the mechanics of the hardware/software. I assume that it requires a lot of computational thinking and heavily relies on accuracy of inputs and proper analysis of the data.

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • Coming from an Indian household the majority of my family works in some division of computer science. so their understanding of the importance and prevalence of computer science is more informed than my own.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • Computer science in our generation is one of the fastest growing markets in America it involves a lot of heavy math and practice of code. In our generation I think everyone has a general gist of what computer science is and its universal presence in an age of technology.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

1.When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • Biology is the study of living organisms by definition, so I think of it as the way to understand the biological world around us and fully utilize its resources

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • I do consider myself a biologist because I am pursuing and already engaging in the practices a biologist would. By practicing biology and engaging in active study of living organisms I would qualify as a biologist.


After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

1.What was the purpose of these readings?

  • The purpose of the Denning articles is to show the prevalence and variety of computer science not only in this current age, but predating computers. It shows how computer sciences has established itself as a necessary tool to not only understand current information, but make new discoveries. The usefulness of computer science is not only limited to computers, but also in furthering every field of science, including biology. The Janovy chapter emphasized the definition of what a true biologist is, but emphasized that though it maybe inclusive there is a certain criteria that involves prioritizing the purpose of biology rather than other prospects. All the pieces had a similar binding theme depicting the importance and diversity of the sciences in our lives.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

  • I personally resonate most with the voice of the user since I am not tech savvy, but I have a lot of appreciation for those who provide me with all the new gadgets and apps. I am personally so dependent on technology and have seen its rapid progress and improvement over my own lifetime that makes me admire computer science and those in it so much.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • Coordination. There principle of coordination is applicable in every situation requiring a group effort. A specific example could be in a workplace in order to complete a project successfully it requires the input, reliance, and efficiency of every party involved.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • I think Janovy's description of people who pursue biology without a true interest in it including students who pick it as a major with no real passion for biology really forced me to evaluate my own purpose in the sciences. It acted as a reminder that my long term goal is simply trying to understand the biological world around me with a genuine passion and curiosity to learn.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • By the definition of Janovy and the Denning articles I would call myself a biologist since it affirmed my belief that a genuine, forefront interest and application of biology is the foundation of what a biologist is.

Nidapatel

Macie Duran

Denning: Before Reading

1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

  • When I hear the term computer science, the first things that come to mind are coding and creating software and applications. I know how precise and tedious the work can be, since computers rely on being given exact instructions. I took technology classes in high school and would learn how to create very simple websites or games, and even those small-scale projects would take a great amount of time and attention to detail.

2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think older people likely think of the same types of processes, but may not have as much of an understanding of how coding is done. Older generations have been alive to see huge technological advances over relatively short periods of time, as opposed to people closer to my age being accustomed to technology from a very young age. For us, it's difficult to imagine a world without the technology that we have.

3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

  • I think younger people might immediately think of video games and applications on their phones.

Janovy: Before Reading

1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

  • When hearing the term biology, I think about the science of all living things. We are able to study how each organism functions on its own, and in relation to other living and non-living things. I like to imagine all the aspects of the world that we have not yet discovered.

2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

  • I do consider myself a biologist. While I may not be a professional or an expert on anything, I have spent a fairly large chunk of my life so far focused on learning biology, and I'm only months away from obtaining a biology degree. I also plan to dedicate the rest of my professional life to continuing to learn biology and using that knowledge to help others.

After Reading

1. What was the purpose of these readings?

  • The purpose of these readings was to show how different STEM disciplines are all connected in ways that we don’t always consider. Computer science and biology are not mutually exclusive fields. Professionals in different fields must collaborate in order to learn from and help one other. The Denning articles also stressed how prevalent computer science is in our everyday lives. We are constantly surrounded by technology, and every profession utilizes computation. The Janovy article explores the field of biology, and what is truly means to be a biologist. Janovy looks at the broader scope of biology, and how each discovery, that may seem highly specific, contributes to our overall understanding of the world around us.

2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

  • The voice that resonated most with me was The Scientist. The first sentence, “I love discovering new things about nature,” just about sums it up for me. I’m fascinated by the world around me and, for as long as I can remember, I’ve been curious to learn about how everything works, and why they work the way that they do.

3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

  • The principle of compression (communication) immediately reminded me of how I learn. As biology majors, we take in a great amount of terms and specific information in our lectures. Sometimes it can seem impossible to remember all of that information when studying for a test or trying to explain a topic to someone else. My brain tends to remember general ideas better. I’ll be able to remember a story or an example of a concept and then use that to remember the specifics on that topic.

4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

  • I enjoyed the Janovy reading because he looked at the role biology plays in the grand scheme of things. When learning about specific details of organisms or processes, it may be easy for some to think, “Who cares?” However, biology isn’t all about learning details and terms. It’s about using that information and applying it to the world. Science is constantly evolving, and we must constantly ask more questions and seek answers and truths.

5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

  • To be a biologist is to be curious. A biologist questions everything and seeks explanations. There is always more to learn and discover, which is what I love about science. Because of this, I do consider myself a biologist. As I said before, I plan on continuing to learn every day and to use the knowledge that I have to contribute to society.

(Macie Duran (talk) 20:37, 9 September 2020 (PDT))