BME100 s2014:W Group14 L3

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Lab Write-Up 1 | Lab Write-Up 2 | Lab Write-Up 3
Lab Write-Up 4 | Lab Write-Up 5 | Lab Write-Up 6
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OUR TEAM

Name: Jose Duran
Name: Shawn Garcia
Name: Christian Keefer
Name: Karthik Puncha
Name: Austin Tielke

LAB 3A WRITE-UP

Descriptive Statistics

Part 1: Body Temperature
In Part 1: Body Temperature of the lab experiment 3A, two medical devices were used to collect body temperature data; 1. a standard oral thermometer, used as the accepted gold standard for reading body temperature, and 2. a RAINN medical wireless sensor, a device being compared to the thermometer by being placed underneath the armpit. The following data will be listed by "Inside" and "Outside" data, each with respect as to where the data was recorded, inside or outside of the lab.

BME100 Lab3 Data1.PNG



Part 2: Blood Pressure and Heart Rate
In Part 2: Body Temperature of the lab experiment 3A, two medical devices were used to collect systolic blood pressure readings; 1. a standard blood pressure (BP) cuff, used as the accepted gold standard for reading blood pressure, and 2. an Omron watch sensor, a device being compared to the BP Cuff by being placed around the wrist and held against the chest. Secondly, two medical devices were used to collect the heart rate (pulses/minute); 1. a standard pulse oximeter, used as the accepted gold standard for reading blood pressure, and 2. an Omron watch sensor, a device being compared to the pulse oximeter by being placed around the wrist and held against the chest.

BME100 Lab3 Data1b.PNG

Results

Part 1: Body Temperature
BME100 Lab3 Graph1.PNG

BME100 Lab3 Graph2.PNG

BME100 Lab3 Graph3.PNG

BME100 Lab3 Graph4.PNG



Part 2: Blood Pressure and Heart Rate
BME100 Lab2 Group14 graph1b.PNG

BME100 Lab2 Group14 graph2b.PNG

BME100 Lab3 Graph3b.PNG

BME100 Lab3 Graph4b.PNG

Analysis

Part 1: Body Temperature
BME100 Lab3 Data2.PNG
BME100 Lab3 Data3.PNG

Part 2: Blood Pressure and Heart Rate
BME100 Lab3 Data2b.PNG
BME100 Lab3 Data3b.PNG

The t-test is used to determine if there is a statistical significance between the data sets of each part of the lab. If statistical significance is found, then it could be concluded that the medical device being compared to the gold standard medical device is a reliable medical device to use. If there is no statistical significance between data sets, then the medical device being compared to the gold standard device is not a reliable device to use.

The Pearson's r coefficient determines whether or not the data has a linear correlation. If the coefficient produced a value near -1, then there would be a negative correlation; a value near 0 would conclude no correlation; and, a value near +1 would conclude a positive correlation within the data sets.

Summary/Discussion

Part 1: Body Temperature
After completing Part 1: Body Temperature of Lab 3A, it can be concluded that there is a statistical significance between the oral thermometer, the gold standard device, and the RAINN sensor placed underneath the armpit; however, when the two devices recorded data outside of the lab, there was no statistical significance. The statistical significance was determined via comparing t-test values with the adjusted p-value (0.0125)..

When comparing the two devices with their respective recordings from inside and outside (i.e. Oral - Inside vs. Oral Outside & Sensor - Inside vs. Sensor - Outside), the t-test values determined that the oral thermometer had statistical significance, as it should because it was the gold standard medical device; however, the sensor had no statistical significance when compared to its inside vs. outside recordings.

The Pearson's R test stated that there was close to no correlation between the oral vs. sensor - inside recordings (0.183382568) and the oral vs. sensor - outside recordings (0.102017045); however, the positive values do determine that there was somewhat of a positive correlation. It would be ideal to have Pearson's R values closest to 1.00.

With regards to the RAINN sensor that was placed underneath the armpit, the Vitals Monitor program that was run on an iPhone via bluetooth disconnected often. This may have skewed the accuracy of the readings while the data was being recorded at separate intervals. Also, there was no way to specifically connect to each lab group's RAINN sensor; thus, it was possible to connect to another lab group's RAINN sensor and record the incorrect data. A recommendation to improve this device would be to have a specific bluetooth address for each device; thus, the iPhone would not connect to the incorrect RAINN sensor.

Part 2: Blood Pressure and Heart Rate
After completing Part 2: Body Temperature of Lab 3A, it can be concluded that there is a statistical significance between the systolic blood pressure readings of the blood pressure cuff, the gold standard device, and the Omron watch sensor placed around the wrist while held against the chest; however, there was no statistical significance between the pulse readings between the pulse oximeter and the Omron watch sensor. The statistical significance was determined via comparing t-test values with the adjusted p-value (0.025).

The Pearson's R test stated that there was close to no correlation between the blood pressure readings of the BP Cuff vs. Sensor (0.14793268). The Pearson's R test also revealed an influential positive correlation between the pulse recordings of the pulse oximeter vs. the Omron watch sensor (0.710135347).

A flaw that may have affected the overall readings of the data may have been where the Omron watch sensor was placed specifically along the wrist. An incorrect placement would have affected the accuracy and precision of the systolic blood pressure and heart rate readings. A recommendation to improving this device would include a specific training lesson on how to correctly use the device before experimentation. Also, the device could read systolic blood pressure readings over very short intervals of a few seconds; then, report the average systolic blood pressure reading to the display screen after an approximate 10-second interval. These two suggestions could be applied to the heart rate pulse readings, as well.

LAB 3B WRITE-UP

Target Population and Need

CareRing & Co.'s The CareRing is a ring-shaped medical device that targets the entire population of the United States of America. This device meets the needs of all consumers because it provides the most convenient way of calculating instantaneous body temperature and heart rate. Because of these features, The CareRing is the best medical device for athletes who wish to seek advanced methods of training and doctors who would like to monitor their patients in a more convenient manner. For each specific target group, the medical device provides a comfort fit around the ring finger of the individual rather than counting heart beats for 10 seconds (and multiplying by 6) or being caught in medical wires in a hospital bed.


Device Design

This device features an enhanced color-changing LED mechanism that alerts the user when his or her heart rate is low, high, or normal. Durable during activity, and water-resistant to sweat and wet conditions, this device includes a toggle button that allows the user to check his or her heart rate and body temperature instantaneously.
BME100 Lab3 Diagram.PNG



Descriptive Statistics

For each of these two experiments, selected subject groups (athletes and hospital patients) were tested in order to find statistical significance in a new medical device, the CareRing, by CareRing & Co. This piece of equipment is a new device that conveniently calculates body temperature and heart rate around the width of the ring finger.

Part 1: Athletes
In Part 1, two gold standard medical devices: an oral thermometer and a pulse oximeter, were used to compare data collected with the new CareRing medical device. An oral thermometer is considered the gold standard to calculated body temperature; meanwhile, a pulse oximeter is considered the gold standard to calculate heart rate. The following data represents the descriptive statistics of athlete measurements recorded after one (1) hour of activity.

BME100 Lab3B Data1.PNG

Part 2: Hospital Patients
In Part 2, two gold standard medical devices: an oral thermometer and a pulse oximeter, were used to compare data collected with the new CareRing medical device. An oral thermometer is considered the gold standard to calculated body temperature; meanwhile, a pulse oximeter is considered the gold standard to calculate heart rate. The following data represents the descriptive statistics of hospital patient measurements recorded after one week of residence.

BME100 Lab3B Data2.PNG

Inferential Statistics

Part 1: Athletes
BME100 Lab3B Analysis1.PNG

Part 2: Hospital Patients
BME100 Lab3B Analysis2.PNG

Graph

Part 1: Athletes
BME100 Lab3B graph1.PNG
BME100 Lab3B graph2.PNG

Part 2: Hospital Patients
BME100 Lab3B graph3.PNG
BME100 Lab3B graph4.PNG