BME100 f2017:Group3 W0800 L3

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OUR TEAM

Name: Joey Green
Name: Julian Klein
Name: Kenny Le
Name: Beerjas Bath
Name: Nathan Atwood

LAB 3 WRITE-UP

Descriptive Stats and Graph

Pulse Ox vs. Spree Band

-Gold Standard Mean--Pulse Ox Device: 98.09

-Spree Band Mean: 98.95

-Gold Standard Standard Deviation--Pulse Ox Device: 23.03

-Spree Band Standard Deviation: 24.88

-Pearson "R" Value: 0.6908

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Oral Thermometer vs. Spree Band

-Gold Standard Mean--Oral Thermometer Device: 96.66

-Spree Band Mean: 95.53

-Gold Standard Standard Deviation--Oral Thermometer Device: 1.922

-Spree Band Standard Deviation: 0.8704

-Pearson "R" Value: 0.1928

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Inferential Stats

Pulse Ox vs. Spree Band

A paired, two-tailed t-test was used to calculate the p-value (0.4271) of the data. After calculating the p-value for heart rate from the given data, a number greater than 0.05 was recorded, meaning that there is no significant statistical difference between the Gold Standard Data and the Spree data. Because of this, the correlation between the data is comparable for heart rate.

Oral Thermometer vs. Spree Band

A paired, two-tailed t-test was used to calculate the p-value (1.097E-21) of the data. After calculating the p-value for temperature from the given data, a number significantly less than 0.05 was recorded, meaning that there is a significant statistical difference between the Gold Standard Data and the Spree data. Because of this statistical difference, the correlation between the data is not comparable for temperature.

Design Flaws and Recommendations

Spree Band Pulse Reading

Although there was a difference in the readings from the Gold Standard and the Spree headband, this difference is not significant enough to warrant the pulse reader in the Spree completely wrong. However, an improvement on this design could be placing the pulse readers closer and more firmly pressed against the area of the head where the temples are to get a stronger reading of the pulse.


Spree Band Temperature Reading

Unlike the pulse reader, the Spree temperature reader was statistically proven to be faulty. A better way to get a temperature reading would be to have multiple sensors in the headband, and by making sure that the sensors are placed directly over the skin rather than over the hair. Another way to get a more accurate reading would be to make the temperature readers closer to the skin of the customer by making the headband out of a material that is thinner and more durable than before.



Experimental Design of Own Device

Since our prototype has so many different respective pieces, there would be several Gold Standards that would need to be in place to ensure accurate data collection. All of these Gold Standards exist at a typical Diabetes patient check-up at a doctors office. The population would be Arizona State University students and the sample of students we would be collecting the data from would be 50 Diabetic students of various ethnicities and races and from varying backgrounds and of varying ages, perhaps. Students would receive our product, the Diabetic Check-Up Kit, that would test their blood pressure, blood glucose levels, weight, the sensitivity of their feet to temperature, cholesterol, and kidney function via a urinalysis test. Readings would be taken once a day for 3 weeks using all of the parts implemented into our device. Student health information would automatically be uploaded to a smartphone app via Bluetooth and would then be stored in a database for further analysis by a health professional. To compare our data to that of the Gold Standard, the students would then be seen by the same health professional directly after using our product, and the doctor would perform a normal Diabetic checkup on the patient, recording all the data that he or she finds for comparison to the data given by our device. After the three weeks, our team would compute the mean, standard deviation, correlation coefficient, and a statistical analysis of the given data, then, graphing all of the results and interpreting the data, we would be able to see if our device measures blood pressure, blood glucose levels, weight, the sensitivity of their feet to temperature, cholesterol, and kidney function accurately in comparison to the data recorded by the doctor during the checkup. By completing this experiment we are able to assess how valid our device is as well as identify any design flaws by comparing the readings of our device to those of the Gold Standard, the conventional doctors' appointment.