BME100 f2017:Group10 W1030 L3

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OUR TEAM

Name: Sarah Desmond
Name: Patrick Mullane
Name: Eddie Aparicio
Name: Adrienne Parkinson
Name: Leslie Olivares


LAB 3 WRITE-UP

Descriptive Stats and Graph

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Inferential Stats

Temperature Data:

P-value: 1.09676 x 10^-21

Because the p-value is so small, there is a difference between the oral temperature readings and the spree's temperature readings.


Heart Rate Data:

P-value: 0.42712

Because the p-value is large there is no significant difference between the two products. The spree headband did a good job of measuring the heart rate for the patients.




Design Flaws and Recommendations

There is a significant difference between the temperature readings found between the spree headband and the gold standard.The spree headband does not provide accurate enough data to determine the temperature.


There is a slight difference between the heart rate readings found between the spree headband and the gold standard. Because the standard deviation for the spree to the golden standard is 23 to 24.8. So in other words, the heart rate readings are almost as reliable as the golden standard.



Experimental Design of Own Device

Experiment Design Temperature:

1. Get two groups of at least 200 people from randomly chosen hospitals throughout the United States. Randomly assign them to be in an active or inactive group.

2. Every 15 minutes for 1.5 hours you will record the temperature from the patient found from the Gold Standard oral thermometer and the Nasal Cannulometer.

3. Analyze the data from the patients and run a statistical analysis between the Cannulometer and the Gold Standard to determine whether there is a significant difference.

We chose this experimental design because using the oral thermometer as the gold standard, it will provide a very accurate reading since it is inside the body. We wanted to separate our patients into two groups so that we were able to see if there was any difference between when the patient was at rest versus when they were walking around.


Experimental Design Comfort:

1. Get two groups of at least 200 people from randomly chosen hospitals throughout the United States. Randomly assign them to be in a group with tape or group using the Nasal Cannulometer.

2. Ask each patient on two different days, two weeks apart to classify the level of comfort they are receiving from the device that they were assigned to on a scale from 1-5(1 being not comfortable and 5 being extremely comfortable).

3. Analyze the data from the patients and run a statistical analysis between the Cannulometer and the tape to decide whether there is a significant difference.

We chose this experimental design because we will be able to qualitatively measure which approach to holding nasal cannula tubes patients prefer based on comfort. We separated them so that we could get a baseline with the approach that doctors tend to use presently. It also reduced biases that could have occurred if we asked the same group about both.