BME100 f2013:W900 Group9 L2

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OUR TEAM - GROUP 9

LAB 2 WRITE-UP

Descriptive Statistics

Human Study

Varying Statistics for LPS

LPS Dose Average Inflammotin (pg/ml) Standard Deviation End Point # Standard Error Average Age
0mg 3.834 1.523010177 10 0.481618106 66.7
5mg 8.932 1.593931547 10 0.504045412 68.1
10mg 61.622 30.11069386 10 9.521837451 68
15mg 657.941 212.9429762 10 67.33848166 67.9

Overall LPS Doses

Inflammotin (pg/ml)
Average 183.08225
Standard Deviation 297.1368812
End Point # 40
Standard Error 46.98146608

Rat Study

Varying Statistics for LPS Doses

LPS Dose Average Inflammotin (pg/ml) Standard Deviation End Point # Standard Error
0mg 10.516 2.225551617 5 0.995296941
10mg 11.112 7.402885924 5 3.310671231

Overall LPS Doses

Inflammotin (pg/ml)
Average 10.814
Standard Deviation 5.163022801
End Point # 10
Standard Error 1.632691166



Results

Human Study LPS Dose on Average Infl (Humans)3.jpg



Rat Study Rats chart 3.jpg





Analysis

Human Study
The data consisted of results from 4 different groups of subjects (0mg, 5mg, 10mg, and 15mg doses), so a one-way ANOVA test was run to find a p-value. The test yielded a p-value of 1.4 x 10-16, which means that the experiment had a percent uncertainty of less than 0.01%. This is much lower than the accepted 5% (or a p-value of 0.05), which means that the results were statistically different between groups. This leads to the conclusion that different dosages of the LPS will produce significantly different levels of Inflammotin in humans.
After running the ANOVA test, a Bonferroni correction was needed to test the statistical difference in each individual comparison. There were 6 comparisons based on the 4 groups (0 vs. 5mg, 0 vs. 10mg, 0 vs. 15mg, 5 vs. 10mg, 5 vs. 15mg, and 10 vs. 15mg). This means that the original alpha value of 0.05 needed to be adjusted; dividing 0.05 by 6 resulted in a new p-value of 0.008333. If the individual comparison yielded a p-value less than 0.008333, then the comparison was statistically different. Each comparison was less than 0.008333 (8.59631 x 10-07, 9.94377 x 10-06, 1.39436 x 10-08, 3.01859 x -05, 1.57101 x 10-08, and 6.4824 x 10-08, respectively), so all the results were statistically different from each other.


Rat Study
The data consisted of results from only 2 different groups (0mg and 10mg doses), so a T-test was run to find the p-value. The test yielded a p-value of 0.867403497, which means that the experiment had a percent uncertainty of about 86.7%. This is much higher than the accepted 5% (or a p-value of 0.05), which means that the results were not statistically different between groups. This leads to the conclusion that giving rats the LPS did not increase Inflammotin levels.







Summary/Discussion

Based on the data and Anova results, the level of Inflammotin in the blood in the Human Study generally increases as the dosage of LPS increases. This is because a p-value of 1.4 x 10-16 was achieved (p-value < .05), meaning that the differences in dosages are significantly different. They have a clear direct, positive relationship. However, in the rat study, the dosage of LPS had no clear relationship with the amount of Inflammotin in the blood as the p-value achieved was .867403487, meaning that the two groups are not significantly different (p-value > .05). All in all, as the LPS dosage rises in humans, the Inflammotin levels rise; however, due to the p-value outcome, the same cannot be said about rats with confidence.