BME100 f2017:Group10 W0800 L3

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OUR TEAM

Name: Whitney Hirano
Name: Nicole Van Alstine
Name: Austin Copps
Name: Jacob Morris
Name: Osvaldo Pagan


LAB 3 WRITE-UP

Mean and Standard Deviation

Heart Rate (Gold Standard vs Spree)

Calculation Gold Standard Spree
Mean 98.3673 98.94079
Standard Deviation 22.2273 24.7966


Temperature (Gold Standard vs Spree)

Calculation Gold Standard Spree
Mean 96.64716049 95.5308642
Standard Deviation 1.9196328 0.869034085

Correlation Coefficient

Pearson's r Coefficient (Oral Thermometer and Spree Band: 0.1402997031 R^2: 0.0196

Pearson's r Coefficient Pulse OX and Spree Band: 0.6880071245 R^2:0.476

Graphs

Screen Shot 2017-09-26 at 10.04.17 PM.png Screen Shot 2017-09-26 at 10.07.01 PM.png Screen Shot 2017-09-26 at 10.07.18 PM.png Screen Shot 2017-09-26 at 10.51.07 PM.png

Summary of Results

The mean value of heart rate calculated from the pulse ox was 98.3673 beats/min with a standard deviation of 22.2273, while the mean value of heart rate calculated from the Spree band was 98.9408 beats/min with a standard deviation of 24.7966. The t value of the heart rate data was 0.221226 and the p value was 0.736226.The t value of the temperature data was 1.097E-21 and the p value was 4.55E-26. From this, we can conclude that with a p value greater than 0.05, the Spree headband was not accurate in monitoring and recording heart rate compared to the pulse ox in the tested subjects. However, with a p value less than 0.05, the Spree headband was more accurate in monitoring and recording temperature compared to the oral thermometer in the tested subjects.

Experimental Design

The experiment would be to shock the brain of an organism other than a human and do an MRI to see the effects of the shock and monitor the chemical output of the brain using MRI. The purpose behind this would be to try to see if there is a correlation between electrical current being supplied to the brain as well as the amount of chemicals being outputted by the brain. Our device is based around electrical impulses and by doing a test electric shock on a nerve in the spine and scanning the effects, it will give us an idea of if the prototype has a chance of being successful and causing the brain to produce necessary chemicals and gain stability without harming it.