BME100 f2015:Group4 1030amL2

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Lab Write-Up 1 | Lab Write-Up 2 | Lab Write-Up 3
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OUR TEAM

Name: Christa Deckman
Name: Gabrielle Mills
Name: Ngan Nguyen
Name: Dylan Bonch
Name: Evan Higgs
Name: Niel Restogi

LAB 2: Means, Standard Deviations, t-test, and ANOVAs

Descriptive Statistics

Experiment 1

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An ANOVA was completed for the human data since multiple levels of dosages were present. A post-hoc was used due to a significant result on the ANOVA.


Experiment 2

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A t-test was completed for the rat data because only two levels of LPS were presented in this sample.

Results

Experiment 1

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Experiment 2


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Analysis

Experiment 1
We are 13.36% confident that there is a significant difference in the Inflammotin protein levels, in pg/mL, between the rat group receiving 0 mg of LPS (control group) and the rat group receiving 5 mg of LPS. Therefore, there is no sufficient evidence to conclude that there is a significant difference in the Inflammotin protein level in result of the difference in LPS dosage amounts.


Experiment 2

We are more than 99% confident that there is a significant difference in the Inflammotin protein levels, in pg/mL, between the four groups of humans receiving 0 mg, 5 mg, 10, mg, and 15 mg of LPS. We are more than 99% confident that there is a significant difference in the Inflammotin protein levels, in pg/mL, between 0 v. 5 mg, 5 v. 10 mg, 10 v. 15 mg, 0 v. 10 mg, 0 v. 15 mg, and 5 v. 15 mg of LPS. Therefore, there is sufficient evidence to conclude that there is a significant difference in the Inflammotin protein level in result of the difference in LPS dosage amounts.



Summary/Discussion

Given the differing results between the human and rat studies, it may be concluded that Inflammoton has a significant effect on humans, and a lesser effect on rats. Seeing as there is little difference in the Inflammotin protein levels between the two dosages in rats, given a high P-value, there is not sufficient evidence that LPS dosages dramatically effect rat protein levels. In addition, given the low P-value, there is sufficient evidence that differing LPS dosages causes a differing amount of Inflammotin protein level growth in humans.