Difference between revisions of "Nachury"

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[[Image:CellCover4.jpg|thumb|300px|right|Bardet-Biedl Syndrome: a disease of the cilium.]]
 
The Nachury Lab is part of the department of [http://mcp.stanford.edu/ Molecular and Cellular Physiology] at [http://med.stanford.edu/ Stanford University School of Medicine].<br>Our lab is interested in using a combination of interdisciplinary approaches encompassing protein biochemistry, cell biology, in vitro assays, digital microscopy and mammalian cell engineering to study the molecular etiology of complex hereditary human diseases.<br>
 
The Nachury Lab is part of the department of [http://mcp.stanford.edu/ Molecular and Cellular Physiology] at [http://med.stanford.edu/ Stanford University School of Medicine].<br>Our lab is interested in using a combination of interdisciplinary approaches encompassing protein biochemistry, cell biology, in vitro assays, digital microscopy and mammalian cell engineering to study the molecular etiology of complex hereditary human diseases.<br>
 
A major focus of the lab is the study of the primary cilium, a once-obscure cellular organelle that has recently been "re-discovered" for its role in a number of signaling pathways (Hedgehog, Planar Cell Polarity, PDGF,..). Most fascinatingly, molecular defects in cilium biogenesis lead to a variety hereditary disorders (so-called "ciliopathies") characterized by retinal degeneration, kidney cysts, obesity, polydactyly, randomization of left-right asymmetry, etc. Our goal is to characterize these ciliopathies at the molecular and cellular levels using state-of-the art proteomics and microscopy. Our approach has already proven successful in the case of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (see figure) and led to the discovery of a protein complex involved in vesicular transport to the primary cilium.
 
A major focus of the lab is the study of the primary cilium, a once-obscure cellular organelle that has recently been "re-discovered" for its role in a number of signaling pathways (Hedgehog, Planar Cell Polarity, PDGF,..). Most fascinatingly, molecular defects in cilium biogenesis lead to a variety hereditary disorders (so-called "ciliopathies") characterized by retinal degeneration, kidney cysts, obesity, polydactyly, randomization of left-right asymmetry, etc. Our goal is to characterize these ciliopathies at the molecular and cellular levels using state-of-the art proteomics and microscopy. Our approach has already proven successful in the case of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (see figure) and led to the discovery of a protein complex involved in vesicular transport to the primary cilium.
  
 
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Bardet-Biedl Syndrome: a disease of the cilium.

The Nachury Lab is part of the department of Molecular and Cellular Physiology at Stanford University School of Medicine.
Our lab is interested in using a combination of interdisciplinary approaches encompassing protein biochemistry, cell biology, in vitro assays, digital microscopy and mammalian cell engineering to study the molecular etiology of complex hereditary human diseases.
A major focus of the lab is the study of the primary cilium, a once-obscure cellular organelle that has recently been "re-discovered" for its role in a number of signaling pathways (Hedgehog, Planar Cell Polarity, PDGF,..). Most fascinatingly, molecular defects in cilium biogenesis lead to a variety hereditary disorders (so-called "ciliopathies") characterized by retinal degeneration, kidney cysts, obesity, polydactyly, randomization of left-right asymmetry, etc. Our goal is to characterize these ciliopathies at the molecular and cellular levels using state-of-the art proteomics and microscopy. Our approach has already proven successful in the case of Bardet-Biedl Syndrome (see figure) and led to the discovery of a protein complex involved in vesicular transport to the primary cilium.

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