Difference between revisions of "Biomod/2013/Harvard/introduction"

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(Background)
(Introduction)
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==Background==
 
  
 
The importance of being able to detect of bioagents pervades our daily lives as it plays an essential role in biotechnology, medicine, agriculture, and even in military.  For example, glucose monitoring for diabetes, fighting bioterrorism,  screening for food toxins, and diagnosing a disease all require an efficient method of detecting bioagents.
 
The importance of being able to detect of bioagents pervades our daily lives as it plays an essential role in biotechnology, medicine, agriculture, and even in military.  For example, glucose monitoring for diabetes, fighting bioterrorism,  screening for food toxins, and diagnosing a disease all require an efficient method of detecting bioagents.
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[[Image: EasyApplications.png | center | 300 px | easy applications]]
 
[[Image: EasyApplications.png | center | 300 px | easy applications]]
  
===Biosensors===
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==Biosensors and Allosteric Switches==
  
 
One approach for detecting bioagents is the use of biosensors.  Biosensors are biologically derived chemical sensing device that recognizes a presence of a certain molecule and outputs a measurable signal in response.  It is composed of two parts:  the bio-element that recognizes a specific analyte, or bioagent, and the transducer that converts the recognition into a readily detectable output signal.
 
One approach for detecting bioagents is the use of biosensors.  Biosensors are biologically derived chemical sensing device that recognizes a presence of a certain molecule and outputs a measurable signal in response.  It is composed of two parts:  the bio-element that recognizes a specific analyte, or bioagent, and the transducer that converts the recognition into a readily detectable output signal.
  
 
[[Image:BiosensorEnzyme.png | frame | center | Fig. 1: A Biosensor Enzyme (Adapted from [[Biomod/2013/Harvard/References#General |  Mohanty et al, 2006]])]]
 
[[Image:BiosensorEnzyme.png | frame | center | Fig. 1: A Biosensor Enzyme (Adapted from [[Biomod/2013/Harvard/References#General |  Mohanty et al, 2006]])]]
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Many have engineered proteins to become a biosensor where the protein is composed of two parts, an input domain (bioelement) and an output domain (transducer).
  
 
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Revision as of 10:30, 20 June 2013

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Introduction

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The importance of being able to detect of bioagents pervades our daily lives as it plays an essential role in biotechnology, medicine, agriculture, and even in military. For example, glucose monitoring for diabetes, fighting bioterrorism, screening for food toxins, and diagnosing a disease all require an efficient method of detecting bioagents.

easy applications

Biosensors and Allosteric Switches

One approach for detecting bioagents is the use of biosensors. Biosensors are biologically derived chemical sensing device that recognizes a presence of a certain molecule and outputs a measurable signal in response. It is composed of two parts: the bio-element that recognizes a specific analyte, or bioagent, and the transducer that converts the recognition into a readily detectable output signal.

Fig. 1: A Biosensor Enzyme (Adapted from Mohanty et al, 2006)

Many have engineered proteins to become a biosensor where the protein is composed of two parts, an input domain (bioelement) and an output domain (transducer).

===