User:Esbenson:History of science in america

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General

  • Bell, “Early American science” (1955)
  • Daniels, Science in American Society
  • Dennis, “Historiography of science” (1997)
  • Dupree, “The history of American science” (1966)
  • Elliott, “Forum for the History of Science in America: Identity and Organization” (1999)
  • Elliott, “Models of the American Scientist” (1982)
  • Hollinger, “Science as a weapon in Kulturkampfe” (1995)
  • Hollinger, “Free enterprise and free inquiry” (1990)
  • Reingold, “Reflections on 200 years of science” (1979)
  • Reingold, ed., Science in America since 1820 (1976)
  • Reingold, Science in nineteenth-century America (1964)
  • Rosenberg, “Science in American society” (1983)
  • Rosenberg, “Toward an ecology of knowledge” (1979)
  • Rossiter, Women Scientists in America (1982, 1995)
  • Shryock, “The need for studies” (1944)
  • Wise, “Science and Technology” (1985)


Science in a developing nation/at the imperial periphery

  • Bedini, Thinkers and Tinkers
  • Brigham, Public Culture in the Early Republic
  • Cohen, Science and the Founding Fathers
  • Dupree, Science and the Federal Government
  • Greene, American Science in the Age of Jefferson
  • Hindle, Pursuit of Science in Revolutionary America
  • Hindle, David Rittenhouse
  • Hindle, “A retrospective view”
  • Oleson & Brown, eds., The Pursuit of Knowledge in the Early American Republic: American Scientific and Learned Societies from Colonial Times to the Civil War
  • Sellars, Mr. Peale's Museum
  • Stearns, Science in the British Colonies of America
  • Struik, Yankee Science in the Making


Pragmatism, democracy, and popular culture

  • Lurie, Louis Agassiz
  • Daniels, “The pure science ideal and democratic culture”
  • Daniels, American Science in the Age of Jackson
  • Guralnik, Science and the Ante-Bellum American College
  • Goetzmann, Army exploration
  • Goetzmann, Exploration and Empire
  • Guralnik, “Sources of misconception ...”
  • Haller, Outcasts from Evolution
  • Johnson, Scientific Interests in the Old South
  • Kohlstedt, “Curiosities and cabinets”
  • Kohlstedt, “Parlors, primers, and public schooling”
  • Miller, Dollars for Research
  • Numbers & Savitt, eds., Science and Medicine in the Old South
  • Owens, “Pure and sound government”
  • Porter, Eagle's Nest
  • Rossiter, “Benjamin Silliman”
  • Secord, Victorian Sensation
  • Sinclair, Philadelphia's Philosopher Mechanics
  • Slotten, “Science, education, and antebellum reform”
  • Stanton, Leopard's Spots

Professionalization and specialization

  • Baatz, Knowledge, culture, and science in the metropolis
  • Barrow, Passion for Birds
  • Barrow, “Specimen dealer”
  • Bittel, “Science, suffrage, and experimentation”
  • Bruce, Launching American Science
  • Daniels, American Science in the Age of Jackson
  • Daniels, “Process of professionalization in American science”
  • Dupree, Science in the Federal Government
  • Dupree, Asa Gray
  • Fleming, Meteorology in America
  • Goldstein, “'Yours for science'”
  • James, Elites in Conflict
  • Kevles et al., “The sciences in America, circa 1880”
  • Kevles, Physicists
  • Kohlstedt, Formation of the American Scientific Community
  • Kohler, “The PhD machine”
  • Livingstone, Nathaniel Southgate Shaler
  • Lurie, Louis Agassiz
  • Midgette, To Foster the Spirit of Professionalism
  • Moyer, A Scientist's Voice in American Culture
  • Moyer, Joseph Henry
  • Nash, “Conflict between pure and applied science”
  • Olseon & Voss, eds., The Organization of Knowledge in Modern America, 1860-1920
  • Overfield, Science with Practice
  • Rainger, Benson, Maienschein, eds., The American Development of Biology
  • Reingold, “Definitions and speculations”
  • Rossiter, Emergence of Agricultural Science
  • Schneider, “Local knowledge”
  • Slotten, Patronage, Practice, and the Culture of American Science
  • Slotten, “Dilemmas of science”
  • Star & Griesemer, “Institutional ecologies”
  • Tobey, Saving the Prairies


Science, expansion, and imperialism

  • Adas, Dominance by Design
  • Adas, Machines as the Measure of Men
  • Anderson, “'Where every prospect pleases ...'”
  • Anderson, “Excremental colonialism”
  • Anderson, “The trespass speaks”
  • Bieder, Science Encounters the Indian
  • Fleming, Meteorology in America
  • Goetzmann, Army exploration
  • Goetzmann, Exploration and empire
  • Haraway, “Teddy-bear patriarchy”
  • Harrison, “Science and politics”
  • Hofstatder, Social Darwinism
  • Livingstone, Nathaniel Southgate Shaler
  • Love, Race over Empire
  • Manning, Government in Science
  • Manning, U.S. Coast Survey vs. Navy Hydrographic Office
  • Pauly, “Beauty and menace”
  • Pauly, “The world and all that is in it”
  • Pauly, Biologists and the Promise of American Life
  • Slotten, Patronage
  • Worster, A River Running West


Organization and industrialization

  • Aitken, Scientific Management in Action
  • Chandler, Visible Hand
  • Dennis, Accounting for Research
  • Fitzgerald, Business of Breeding
  • Geiger, To Advance Knowledge
  • Graham, R&D for Industry
  • Hart, Forged Consensus
  • Hounshell & Smith, Science and Corporate Strategy
  • Hounshell, “Edison and the pure science ideal”
  • Hughes, American Genesis
  • Klein, “Construing 'technology' as 'applied science'”
  • Kleinman, Politics on the Endless Frontier
  • Kohler, Partners in Science
  • Layton, “Mirror-image twins”
  • Lecuyer, “Academic science and technology”
  • Lecuyer, “Making of a science based technological university”
  • Noble, America by Design
  • Reich, Making of American Industrial Research
  • Reich, “Edison, Coolidge, and Langmuir”
  • Rossiter, Emergence of Agricultural Science
  • Servos, Physical Chemistry
  • Servos, “Industrial relations of science”
  • Smith, “Wallace Carothers”
  • Shapin, “Who is the industrial scientist?”
  • Wise, “Ionists in industry”
  • Wise, Willis R. Whitney


Places, practices, material culture, and social structure

  • Anderson, “'Where every prospect pleases'”
  • Benson, “From museum research to laboratory research”
  • Capshew & Rader, “Big science”
  • Creager, Life of a Virus
  • Galison, Image and Logic
  • Galison & Hevly, eds., Big Science
  • Gusterson, Nuclear Rites
  • Hales, Atomic Spaces
  • Haraway, Primate Visions
  • Hollinger, “Free enterprise and free inquiry”
  • Kaiser, “Suburbanization”
  • Kirsch, Proving Grounds
  • Kleinman, Impure Science
  • Knorr-Cetina, Epistemic Cultures
  • Kohler, Landscapes and Labscapes
  • Kohler, “Labscapes”
  • Kohler, Lords of the Fly
  • Kohler, “Drosophila”
  • Kohler, From medical chemistry to biochemistry
  • Kohlstedt, “Curiosities and cabinets”
  • Kuletz, Tainted Desert
  • Latour & Woolgar, Laboratory Life
  • Lynch, Art and Artifact
  • Mitman, “When nature is the zoo”
  • Montgomery, “Place, practice, and primatology”
  • Owens, “Pure and sound government”
  • Pauly, “Summer resort and scientific discipline”
  • Rader, Making Mice
  • Rainger, “Constructing a landscape”
  • Shaping, “What is the industrial scientist?”
  • Star & Griesemer, “Institutional ecologies”
  • Tobey, Saving the Prairies
  • Westwick, National Labs


Using science to reform society

  • Allen, “Eugenics record office”
  • Auerbach, “Scientists in the New Deal”
  • Clarke, Disciplining Reproduction
  • Colgrove, “'Science in a democracy'”
  • Galison, “Aufbau/Bauhaus”
  • Haskell, Emergence of Professional Social Science
  • Hollinger, “Science and anarchy”
  • Kevles, In the Name of Eugenics
  • Kevles, “Testing the Army's intelligence”
  • Kimmelman, “American Breeders' Association”
  • Kloppenberg, Uncertain Victory
  • Kohler, Partners in Science
  • Kuznick, “Losing the world of tomorrow”
  • Kuznick, Beyond the Laboratory
  • Rosenberg, No Other Gods
  • Ross, Origins of American Social Science
  • Larson, Summer for the Gods
  • Larson, Sex, Race, and Science
  • Livingstone, Nathaniel Southgate Shaler
  • Mitman, State of Nature
  • Moyer, Scientist's Voice
  • Owens, “Pure and sound government”
  • Pauly, Controlling Life
  • Pauly, Biologists and the Promise of American Life
  • Pauly, “Modernist practice in American biology”
  • Rydell, “Fan dance of science”
  • Slotten, Patronage, Practice, and the Culture of American Science
  • Steel, Walter Lippman
  • Thurtle, “Harnessing heredity”
  • Tobey, American Ideology of National Science
  • Tobey, Saving the Prairies
  • van Keuren, “Science, progressivism, and military preparedness”
  • Veblen, Engineers and the Price System
  • Walter, Science and Cultural Crisis
  • Westbrook, John Dewey


The militarization of American science?

  • Amadae, Rationalizing Capitalist Democracy
  • Appel, Shaping Biology
  • Bocking, “Ecosystems, ecologists, and the atom”
  • Boyer, By the Bomb's Early Light
  • Bush, Science, The Endless Frontier
  • Doel, “Constituting the postwar earth sciences”
  • Edwards, Closed World
  • Engerman, “Rethinking Cold War universities”
  • England, A Patron for Pure Science
  • Forman & Sanchez-Ron, eds., National Military Establishments
  • Forman, “Beyond quantum electronics”
  • Galison & Hevly, eds., Big Science
  • Galison, “Physics between war and peace”
  • Galison, “Ontology of the enemy”
  • Gerovitch, “Mathematical machines”
  • Gusterson, Nuclear Rites
  • Haraway, Primate Visions
  • Hewlett et al., Atomic Shield
  • Hewlett & Holl, Atoms for Peace and War
  • Kaiser, “Cold war requisitions”
  • Kevles, “Cold war and hot physics”
  • Kirsch, Proving Grounds
  • Kleinman, Politics on the Endless Frontier
  • Koistinen, “The 'industrial-military' complex”
  • Lasby, Project Paperclip
  • Latham, Modernization as Ideology
  • Leslie, Cold War and American Science
  • Lowen, Creating the Cold War University
  • MacLeod, “Strictly for the birds”
  • Mendelsohn et al., eds., Science, Technology, and the Military
  • Mukerji, Fragile Power
  • Needell, “From military research to big science”
  • Needell, “Project Troy”
  • Needell, “Lloyd Berkner”
  • Needell, Science, Cold War, and the American State
  • Noble, Forces of Production
  • Oreskes, “Laissez-tomber”
  • Oreskes, “A context of motivation”
  • Perkins, Geopolitics and the Green Revolution
  • Reingold, “Science in the Civil War”
  • Roland, “Science and war”
  • Roland, “Science, technology, and war”
  • Russell, War and Nature
  • Sapolsky, Science and the Navy
  • Sherry, In the Shadow of War
  • Solovey, “Project Camelot”
  • van Keuren, “Cold War science in black and white”
  • Weart, Discovery of Global Warming
  • Westwick, National Labs


The politics of expertise

  • Auerbach, “Scientists in the New Deal”
  • Balogh, Chain Reaction
  • Boyer, “From activism to apathy”
  • Carson, Silent Spring
  • Compton, “Report of the Science Advisory Board”
  • Dunlap, DDT
  • Dunlap, Saving America's Wildlife
  • Englehart, End of Victory Culture
  • Fitzgerald, Every Farm a Factory
  • Greenberg, Politics of Pure Science
  • Hilgartner, Science on Stage
  • Hollinger, “Science as a weapon in Kulturkampfe”
  • Jasanoff, Fifth Estate
  • Jasanoff, Science at the Bar
  • Kaiser, “Atomic secret in red hands?”
  • Kaiser, “Nuclear democracy”
  • Kargon & Hodes, “Karl Compton”
  • Kevles, “George Ellery Hale”
  • Kevles, Physicists
  • Kirsch, Proving Grounds
  • Kleinman, “Layers of interest, layers of influence”
  • Kuznick, Beyond the Laboratory
  • Light, From Warfare to Welfare
  • Mackenzie & Spinardi, “Tacit knowledge”
  • Merton, Sociology of Science
  • Mirowski, Machine Dreams
  • Mirowski, “Cyborg agonistes”
  • Mooney, Republican War on Science
  • Needell, Science, Cold War, and the American State
  • Numbers, Creationists
  • O'Neill, Firecracker Boys
  • Popper, The Open Society
  • Rudolph, Scientists in the Classroom
  • Schrecker, No Ivory Tower
  • Schweber, In the Shadow of the Bomb
  • Scott, Seeing Like a State
  • Shaping, “Who is the industrial scientist?”
  • Slayton, “Speaking as scientists”
  • Solovey, “Project Camelot”
  • Thackray, “Reflections on the decline of science”
  • Thorpe, “Disciplining experts”
  • Wang, “Science, security, and the cold war”
  • Wang, American science in an age of anxiety
  • Wisnioski, “Inside 'the system'”
  • Zachary, Endless Frontier


Science in a 'knowledge society'?

  • Castells, Rise of the Network Society
  • Epstein, Impure Science
  • Etzkowitz, “Second academic revolution”
  • Etzkowitz, “Bridging the gap”
  • Fujumura, Crafting Science
  • Gusterson, “The death of the authors of death”
  • Helmreich, Silicon Second Nature
  • Kevles, Physicists
  • Keller, Making Sense of Life
  • Kleinman, Impure Cultures
  • Kleinman, “Science, capitalism, and the rise of the 'knowledge worker'”
  • Kleinman, “Untangling context”
  • Kloppenberg, First the Seed
  • Knorr-Cetina, Epistemic Cultures
  • Rabinow, Making PCR
  • Thackray, ed., Private Science
  • Williams, Retooling
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