BIOL368/F16:Class Journal Week 1

From OpenWetWare

Jump to: navigation, search

Contents

Anindita Varshneya

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • When I think about computer science, I think about programming and data storage and manipulation. Computer science, to me, is about creating efficient ways to complete tasks that would otherwise be incredibly tedious or impossible without the use of technology.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • When older relatives/friends talk to me about computer science, the conversation mostly centers around code. Most older relatives and friends in my network are concerned about how technology will "take over" the world, and the effects of artificial intelligence and machine learning on humanity. However, these conversations may be influenced by the fact that most older relatives and friends in my network work in technology or computer engineering because I grew up in the Silicon Valley.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • When younger relatives and friends hear the term computer science, I think they imagine a person in a dark room hunched over a laptop writing a foreign language that they don't understand. They talk about the importance of computer science and the influence it will have in several aspects of society.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • When I hear the term biology, I initially think about cells, plants, and animals and the complex functions they complete. I think about how much we still don't know, but how quickly the field has expanded within the last decade due to modern technologies. I also think about how biology and technology are merging together to create ethical dilemmas unlike anything we have seen before.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • I believe that a biologist is anyone who studies biology and/or contributes, in any way, to the research and continued understanding of the field. Because I participate in research that stems from a biological background, and I pursue more knowledge of different subfield within biology on almost a daily basis, I do consider myself a biologist.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • The purpose of these readings is to expose us to various aspects of biology and computer science, and see how easily they fit together. These articles are a great introduction to bioinfomatics and the two fields that it is most directly associated with.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • The voice of the scientist resonates with me the most. While the voices of the user and the computational thinker are also very relatable because of how much I enjoying problem solving, finding the logic in complex situations, and playing with new softwares and technologies, the idea of stretching boundaries and challenging myself to find new answers to new questions is incredibly exciting. Especially in fields that combine biology and computer science, the voice of the scientist is the most interesting to me.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • The principle of "design" is applicable to several different fields and to everyday life. For example, door knobs need to be effectively designed to communicate to the user whether they should push or pull. If there is a flatter door handle, the user is more likely to push, while if there is a turning door knob, the user is more likely to pull.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • I found the shift between "I do" to "I am" to be incredibly interesting. This concept applies itself to almost all aspects of life because it challenges you to go beyond you actions and to recognize how your actions ultimately become a part of you and affect the way you look at the world. I also like the way that Janovy explained that shifting to an "I am" perspective forces you to think outside of the box and be more creative.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • Being a biologist means being a naturalist and being curious about the world and how it works. A biologist seeks to learn more about their surroundings and understand several different aspects of life. I would consider myself a biologist because I love learning more about the world, and do believe that I have a sense of curiosity about the world and strive to learn more every day.

-- Anindita Varshneya 01:13, 6 September 2016 (EDT)


Avery Vernon-Moore

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • I automatically think of coding and creating web pages or apps for cell phones. I honestly know little to nothing about computer science.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I’m not sure, since they were around for the beginning of some of these major advances I would assume they think more of coding and possibly have more of an understanding about the engineer side of computer science.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I would assume they have similar thoughts to mine, and possibly think about video games or even more science fiction type things.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • I automatically just think of all of the components of biology: anatomy, physiology, cell, molecular, medicine, ecology, etc… just the components that make us and our lives up.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • I don’t know if I would give myself that title, but I guess in some sense I am a biologist since I am studying biology on an almost daily basis in college.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • The purpose of these readings was to provide us with an introduction to computer science and biology and show us how the two work together in the science world. The computer science article went into detail chronologically to show us how it has evolved and matured so rapidly. It illustrated how the advancement of computer science has helped to link it to other sciences. The papers were showing that computer science is more of a natural science than people might assume.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • The scientist and the engineer appeal the most to me, but I honestly think I am the most like the consumer. I relate to the engineer in the sense that I enjoy building things and figuring out how to put stuff together on my own, and I think the scientist appeals to me the most just because I am studying biology and have always been fascinated by science and nature and knew that this was the direction I wanted to take in life. Its just hard for me to fully relate to this because I still don't fully understand everything about computer science and algorithms and what not.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • The first thing that comes to mind is applying the principle "search" to my hostessing job. You could go about the daily tasks in many different ways, but I've noticed that I have developed patterns in the ways I go about my tasks and the order I do them in.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • I found it interesting that Janovy thinks an experience with animals or other organisms during our younger years will be the so impactful that it is the main reason someone would want to pursue a career in biology. I really appreciated the part where he is writing about his colleague and how he points out the importance of caring about life on earth besides humans. I agree 100% when he says "the decision to become a biologist demands an attachment to the world of living organisms". I'm not sure if I think some of my most memorable childhood experiences involved animals, but in my plant ecology class we were all asked what we thought we would grow up to be when we were 8 years old, and almost every person in the class had the response veterinarian.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • After reading the article I don't think I have a clearer idea whether or not I would consider myself a biologist. I don't think I chose this major purely because of the professions I would be more capable of obtaining. I have always held value in other aspects of life besides just humans and our society, but I don't know if being a biologist is necessarily a life-long goal of mine. The subject matter or biology is so broad that I think it is hard to classify who would be considered a biologist and who is not. I think I could be considered a biologist in the sense that I'm curious, I understand the interdependence we have with other organisms and the world we live in and that I'm intrigued by the complexities of our bodies and other organisms and am driven to learn more about them.

Avery Vernon-Moore 01:55, 2 September 2016 (EDT)


Shivum A Desai

  • Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?

I think of my interpretation of coding which is writing a bunch of 0's and 1's into a computer to make anything happen without using passwords or usernames. Essentially, I think of hacking.

When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

I think "the next big thing" is what comes to their minds. I believe that computer science is an up and coming field in today's world and to older relatives and friends it is the way of the future and basically a new horizon for them.

When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?

I think when younger people think of computer science they basically think of the same things I do, which is hacking, and the movie the Matrix.
  • Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?

When I think of biology I think of life and everything that has to do with living organisms.

Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?

I dont consider myself a biologist because I am not particularly interested in the science of biology, whether is is molecular or evolutionary. I am interested in medicine and biology is the foundation of that field.
  • After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

What was the purpose of these readings?

The purpose of these reading was to describe how biology and computer science have come together over the years and how they can interact. The articles also describe the effect of computer science on the field of biology as a whole and how it has changed biology by allowing for the formation of novel subfields that would otherwise not have arisen without technology.

Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?

I am most definitely "the user" because I appreciate technology for all it has given my generation, especially computers, but other than that I do not often delve into the deeper details behind the use or formation of the technology itself. I believe that would be something left to those who appeal to the "mathematician" or "programmer."

Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.

I think the "recollection" principle is the one I can most definitely relate too the most. That is because recollection is an extremely vital and basic aspect of our everyday lives because it applies to almost every single action us human make on a daily basis. Tasks as simple as making a bowl of cereal in the morning require recollection because one must remember where the box of cereal is located in the kitchen or in which room the box is located, for that matter. Recollection also can be applied to much more advanced aspects such as memorizing information for a test. Being able to recall studied information is extremely important in such a situation.

What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?

I found this reading to be informative but at the same time it also stressed information that is very obvious to those in the scientific field. It is true that with the increase in technology there are many new areas of science that have opened up, specifically subsections of biology that no on would have ever thought would exist. And it is also true that due to this diversification, scientists will end up picking one of these specific fields and then be left out of the loop when it comes to connecting their ideas with those of scientists in other fields, but i think this is too negative of an outlook. I think biologists can still be "naturalists" that have a general outlook on science while still focusing specifically on a section of biology. It just comes down to whether that scientist is trying to apply his or her research to other aspects of biology or if they are simply trying to delve deeper into their own field and research.

What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?

I think a biologist is simply anyone who take a view at nature, no matter how specific or general that view may be, and begins to analyze that view in terms of how things work and not on how it looks, feels, or smells etc. Biologists have a desire to know how living things operate and why and thus is why i believe to be a biologist you simply need to have that desire to understand the inner workings of nature. I guess, contrary to my answer before reading this text, I am a biologist because even though i do not desire to understand the inner workings of an ecosystem or bacterial colonies, I do have an interest in the inner workings of the human body. Therefore, yes, I am a biologist.

Shivum A Desai 14:50, 6 September 2016 (EDT):



User:Zachary T. Goldstein

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    I have a couple friends at LMU who are computer science majors, so I guess what comes to mind when I hear "computer science" is them. I imagine people sitting behind a computer writing code with glazed eyes from staring at a screen for so long. Computer programmers, coding, video games, etc...
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    I would imagine similar things come to mind when older relatives think about computer science, although they probably imagine old computer code in green text on a black screen while I see it as a modern job on MacBooks in high demand.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    They probably imagine "nerds" sitting behind a computer screen smashing their fingers on the keyboard. They probably understand that computer scientists create everything you experience and use on a computer but have no idea how any of it is actually done.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    Plants, animals, the study of life. Relationships between organisms and their environment, evolution, physiology and anatomy. I think of cells and organelles, medicine, and research.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    I do consider myself a biologist to an extent, although I don't think I will ever really become a true "biologist". I take biology classes and am very interested in how nature works, but I find myself attracted to chemistry just as much (if not more) than I am to biology. I believe myself to be a biologist mostly because I see the world as a biologist would see it...for example, when I watch a sporting event I think about all of the electrical impulses and complex pathways necessary for humans to perform in such unique ways.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    The purpose of these readings was to enhance our perspectives on how computing and biology are incorporated into every-day life, and how computer scientists and biologists come to be. More specifically, these articles served to explain the history of the demand for computer science, information technology, and programming, and detailed to us why these fields will not die out as soon as people are expecting; in fact they predict there will be a large increase in the computing population over the next several years (Denning, 2007). The final article also discussed the controversy over becoming a biologist, the values required to understand biology, and views that non-biologists might have on people who deem themselves "biologists".
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    The voice of the user appealed to me most because I do enjoy using technology. It excites me, and the complexity of it amazes me, I can appreciate how much work goes into creating it all, but I don't quite get into the details as much as the programmer or mathematician would. The economist in me also agrees with user's idea that my (consumer) desires drive the technology market.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    The first principle of computing is Intractability, also known as computation. I believe this concept relates closely to how our bodies work; i.e. to perform a simple task such as grabbing a pencil, millions of neurons must fire, electrical impulses have to be sent down pathways to muscles causing them to contract and release all in unison. Even the most simple physical tasks require tons of small inputs that we don't see from the outside, just like the computations required to perform a simple task on a computer or phone.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    What I found most provocative about the Janovy reading was the idea that the controversy behind biology is largely due to the biologist's view of humans in terms of the history of the world (and nature, of course). Janovy explains early in the article that many other professions, such as physicians, accountants, and lawyers, focus entirely on human wants and needs, while biologists see humans as a minuscule small part of a long history of the world, also recognizing that in the short amount of time humans have been around, we have caused an immense amount of previously unmatched, irreversible damage to our natural climate. Biologists are amazed at the complexity of life that humans live, but also see how destructive our existence has been. Simply put, biologists see both sides of human nature and I think the comparisons between the styles of thinking is very interesting. My next question in this debate would be which style of thinking is better?
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    After reading these articles I believe I have changed my mind; I no longer see myself as a biologist, nor do I see myself wholly becoming a biologist in the future. If anything I would identify myself in the role of a "technician", and a technician in training, as Janovy put it-someone who works with tools and understands biology but is not yet able to apply it as a true "naturalist" would. A biologist is someone who observes, asks questions, uses tools, and values nature and the history of the world. The side of biology that holds my real interests is anatomy and physiology, not the field work side as described in the article; the example was given of studying frogs in exotic environments. I don't see myself as a biologist because I am more intrigued by the human aspect as opposed to the "interaction between organisms" aspect of biology, even though I do have a natural curiosity for how organisms and nature work. Later in life when I become a physician maybe I will make an observation about a medical condition and interconnect areas of science to help solve a problem, but until that day comes I do not think I can call myself a true biologist.

Zachary T. Goldstein 20:18, 4 September 2016 (EDT)Zachary T. Goldstein


Mia Huddleston

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • When I hear the term computer science I tend to think of a lot of coding and programing data with a lot of time spent at the computer.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I think since most people older than our generation didn't use computers until they were much older than we started at, they really don't know much about computer science and probably relate it to a lot of random numbers and letters on a computer screen.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I think that younger relatives must think of computer science as the behind the scenes of their computer games and video games etc. and what makes their electronics do the things they do.
  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • When I hear the word biology what comes to mind the most is evolution and how the natural world around us works and was created.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • I don’t think I would consider myself a biologist especially because I have not completed my schooling yet and don’t have my degree in biology yet, but also because that is not my aim after I graduate college.
  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • The purpose of these readings are to understand on a more concrete level of why computer science and bioinformatics has become so critical in our lifetime and to the study of biology.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • I relate most to both the user and the scientist. I fell as if I am pretty good at understanding computers and how they work, however I have never taken a formal class on computer science. Most of the time computer applications come pretty easily to me and I don't have to work hard at learning how to do it, but I also have a lot of fun playing with it. I connect with the scientist since I really love learning new things, especially about nature. I think it is extremely important to a always be exploring new things.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • The recollection or locality principle is the first principle that I could easily relate to every day life as it is something we need every day. From studying and trying to memorize definitions for a test to even how I bike to school everyday, recollection is extremely important. Each of these two memories are very separate from each other and yep I am doing the same thing in trying to remember what I need to do. For biking to school I have to recall how biking works, which streets to take, where to lock up my bike, and what my bike lock code is.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • I really enjoyed how this article was written especially with the background and first person story telling that really made it easy to read and enjoyable. It really made me think about how many different and new career fields that have been created in biology because of our new developments in technology and how this could effect my own career plans.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • Being a biologist means feeling a connection to the work he or she studies with nature becoming more than just work. It is important to understand as a biologist that we do not know everything about the world we live in and will need to continue to study it. Like Janovy says, biologists see our world as one that we still do not comprehend fully. With his definition of a biologist, I do now consider myself more of a biologist than I did previously because of my interest in learning and the need for a constant flow of knowledge about our world.

Mia Huddleston 16:27, 5 September 2016 (EDT)


Matthew R Allegretti

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • The ability to create programs through the implementation of one of the various languages of coding.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • Creating applications such as Microsoft Office.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • Creating games or apps for mobile devices.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • Study of organisms, their functions, and how they interact with their environments.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • I would consider myself an amateur biologist at most. While I have learned much about biology, I have not necessarily put into practice what I have learned and have contributed little to understanding more about how organisms interact with their environments.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • To view both the fields of computer science and biology through a wider perspective.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • I most heavily identify with "the user". I enjoy computers, but do not do much beyond becoming proficient with the tools provided to me.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • Reading a textbook is a form of compression. You are provided with a mass of text and figures, and your brain processes the most important facts for later recall.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • I found it interesting how Janovy contrasted various fields. Through the example of studying an enzymatic process, they were able to illustrate that similar problems can be encountered in various fields, but what you plan to learn from tackling that problem changes with the field.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • Being a biologist is valuing the information that can be gained from all organisms with equal merit. I both do and do not consider myself a biologist. While I do have an appreciation for the information that can be gained by studying a wide variety of animals, I have grown to value studies that directly impact human life more highly than studies that help humans understand life in a broader sense.

Matthew R Allegretti 17:22, 5 September 2016 (EDT)


Colin Wikholm

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • When I think of computer science, coding languages and calculations immediately come to mind. I think about computers performing tasks that would otherwise take immense amount of time. However, I also think about the limitations of current computer science, specifically in the realm of artificial intelligence and modeling of biological systems. Lastly, I think about how the way that computers store information is similar to DNA, and I think about a talk I watched in which immense amount of information was stored in artificially synthesized DNA. Biology and computer science aren't altogether different.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I think the majority of individuals from older generations (specifically those with little experience with computers) view computer science as an abstract science. I can relate that computer science often seems like magic and is something I wish to understand. However, I feel that many of my older generation aren't very interested in how computer science works or how they might utilize it for their own use. They view it as a tool to perform specific needs, not as something with almost unlimited potential.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I think my younger relatives or friends see computer science as a mode to provide entertainment. I feel that, at a young age, computer science simply appears to be a way to make video games, work on the internet, and make special effects in movies. However, I do feel that the younger generation (even those inexperienced with coding or in-depth computer experience) recognize the potential that computer science has to change the world and improve the dissemination of information throughout the world.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • Above all, the term "biology" makes me feel a sense of awe. The study of life is something that amazes me, most likely because biology is likely too complex for us to understand in its entirety. Another concept that comes to mind is simplicity and intricacy. The interactions between systems (for example, in metabolism) are breathtakingly extensive. However, when studying the mechanisms of these systems at the most basic level, I am reminded that every component is governed by the same four fundamental forces. Even the most complex interactions come from a few basic principles.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • I consider myself a biologist. Biology is the study of life. I study life (and in an academic setting) and believe it is one of my personal passions.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • I think the purpose of these readings was to integrate different fields in a way that shows the potential of our current situation as humans. Specifically, the natural sciences and computer science (and other fields like physics, mathematics, and even social sciences) have the potential to contribute to great things. Each field can gain from the other and lead to exploration of our reality that is multifaceted and far more advanced than we previously imagined. The future is bright.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • I think the 'Scientist' voice most appealed to me. It spoke to the areas of discovery and asking questions, two concepts that are central to how I live my life. Nonetheless, this voice still remembers the practical applications of these advancements in knowledge. Although the pursuit of knowledge is a noble cause, it still has uses in everyday life and can gain from all different fields.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • "Automation" applies to much of what we as humans think, feel, and do. Although our conscious actions are very intentional and precise, our many life functions depend on automatic processes. If we think to much about breathing, it may become less smooth or rhythmic. If we try to control our heart rate, it may extend beyond the normal range. Our automated processes are essential to our survival, and often perform better than even our conscious actions.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • The most interesting concept to me about the Janovy reading concerned the idea of knowledge for the sake of knowledge, or knowledge for the sake of utility. A distinction that I realized in my first two years of college (and which initially frustrated me considerably) was that many scientists performed research for the sake of understanding how organisms, processes, and systems worked. This contrasted the research such on things such as cancer treatments drug therapies, which had clear purpose or use. Although I still don't altogether agree with this mode of action, I have come to better understand the beauty of pure understanding. I appreciated the fact that the author made this point, as it is something that I feel isn't often discussed among my peers.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • In the most basic terms, to be a biologist means to ask questions about life and to pursue the truth in the form of an answer. I consider myself a biologist, as this is something I do daily with certain enjoyment.

Note: readings mentioned in above responses refer to Voices of Computing, Computing is a Natural Science, and chapter 1 of On Becoming a Biologist. Links to these readings can be found on the following page: BIOL368/F16

Colin Wikholm 01:32, 7 September 2016 (EDT)


Will Fuchs

Reflection Questions Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • The different languages that can be utilized to develop programs and other useful computer tools.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • They probably think of Silicon Valley or people who sit at computers for work.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • Perhaps they think of boys and girls in glasses as an association of the computer science profession.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • Time-lapse photos/videos of rainforest plants going through their life cycles. I also think about viruses, bacteria and cells.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • Yes, because I am passionate about this field of study, although I haven't made a formal contribution yet. I love talking and teaching about all the things I've learned at LMU.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • To gather a thorough and legitimate perspective on the concepts of Biology and Computer Science.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • I would definitely be "The User" I love computers and I really can appreciate the things that computer scientists produce but I don't have any desire to learn on the how aspect of their profession. I am part of the ranks of the consumers that set up the demand for apps, technology and so on.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • The "Recollection" principle resonated with me the most. I'm learning Japanese this year and I rely heavily on the storage and retrieval of data in my brain when I am trying to interpret Hiragana characters. Without my recollection process I couldn't build upon prior knowledge.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • On page 24 regarding the methods of Ecologists and Behaviorists, it was interesting to read how their scope of research demands them to look outside the cells, beyond proteins and genes to achieve a more holistic understanding of phenomena.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • It's just a frame of mind, and that's up to the interpretation of the beholder, one just needs to have the thirst for knowing more. In that regard I am definitely a biologist.


William P Fuchs 20:24, 5 September 2016 (EDT)

---

Matthew K. Oki

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • I immediately think of designing websites and html coding. I’m thinking of nothing very fancy, but very basic website design.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • My older relatives think computer science is learning how to use computers and electronics. This could be an accurate definition of computer science, but their “learning how to use a computer” is very basic like turning it on and off without breaking it.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I think my younger brother thinks it’s more like game design. I know nothing about game coding, but I would think it’s very complicated compared to what we are making.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • When I hear biology, I think of what we learned in freshman biology: the studying of basic organism’s development and behavior. This is on the cellular, organismal, and the ecological level.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • I do consider myself a biologist because I conduct experiments on these organisms in order to learn more about the world around me.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • The purpose of this reading was to give us a background on how biology and computer science interact with each other. It was interesting to see how the relationship between the two grew to biology needing computer science to work at all.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • The engineer appeals the most with me because I love to build things. I have to picture things in my head in order to learn it for school, and it also works with building things.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • The principle that made the most sense to me was the communication or compression principle. This principle talks about significantly suppressing data, but being able to recover the most valuable of that data. I work on the farm back home in Northern California. While operating the equipment you can’t talk to anyone around you, so we rely on hand signals a majority of the time. This to me is suppressing data, but being able to take the important parts with you.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • I think the most provocative portion of the Janovy reading was when he says that the interactions between the fields of biology have filters of different values and beliefs. He is saying there are no more naturalists anymore. I don't think this is true. I still think that there are naturalists who can shut out the specific values of a certain field of biology.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • I still consider myself a biologist after reading this article. To be a biologist means you are a naturalist. This means that you study all fields of biology like biochemistry, molecular biology, and genetic engineering without having a biased view from any one field. So, I think I am a biologist because I do not have a bias towards any one field. If I were to specialize in say biochemistry, I would no longer say I am a biologist but a biochemist.


Courtney Merriam

Denning Articles Pre Reading Questions:

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • When I hear the term computer science I think of coding and a ton of computer work that I don't understand.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • When older relatives or friends hear the term computer scienceI think a foreign language comes to their minds.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science I think they think of gaming and common knowledge.

Janovy Chapter Pre Reading Questions:

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • When I hear the term biology I think of the half field and research of medical advancements.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • I do consider myself a biologist because I study biology and perform experiments and collect data.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter Questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • The purpose of these readings is to shed the light on to the understanding of in-depth computer science and bioinformatics, which has become interwoven in out ever day lives.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • I feel the voice of the mathematician appeals to me the most. I am a very logical person and I enjoy math and solving problems. Math and physics seem difficult to many but I really enjoy them.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • The third principle of computing is Coordination. I find this concept relating to the negative feedback loop of the endocrine system of the body with balance of calcitonin and calcitriol levels. With the two levels in balance it allows for proper calcium levels in the bones and in the blood so not to weaken growing bones.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • I found it interesting that he says it is impossible to make a case for early experience as a crucial factor in life choices. Life is always changing and there is no way of knowing for certain how things will end up. One case for this would be evolution; there is no formula to know how things will change in a species by early experiences.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • Being a biologist means always in the pursuit for knowledge and advancements in the biological field, everything pertaining to life. I do consider my self to be a biologist because I have interest in learning biology and learning more about the world we live in and how to advance it.


Jordan T. Detamore

Denning Articles Pre Reading Questions:

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • When I hear the term computer science, coding, number crunching, and graphic design come to mind.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I think that they may not think much of it. It is something that contributes to their world, but not necessarily something that they will work with in their lifetime.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I think that they may have similar things come to mind as coding, number crunching, and graphic design are the areas we have been most exposed to.

Janovy Chapter Pre Reading Questions:

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • The in depth, multilayer study of organisms
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • Yes. Every day I am learning more about organisms on many different scales.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter Questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • The purpose of these readings was to give information about biology and computer science as well as inspire people to learn more about these subjects and pursue them for themselves. The articles make sure to highlight how important these fields are and how they contribute to our everyday lives.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • The engineer appeals to me the most
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • Countries are made using hierarchical aggregation. Cities make up counties, that make up states, that make up countries.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • I really enjoyed the anecdote about his colleague. To illustrate that all scientists are providing a service to the human population even if they aren't curing cancer is in my opinion very important. These scientists give their life to their studies and should be revered for the work that they do no matter what area of study.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • A biologist is somebody who studies living organisms. I consider myself a biologist because I have done experiments and studies with living organisms and I continue to learn about biology almost every day.

Isai Lopez

Before reading the Denning articles (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term computer science, what comes to mind?
    • Computer science to me is the language of communication and interaction with other computers through the use of code.
  2. When older relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • When older relatives and friends hear the term computer science, I think they are preoccupied with aspects of how computer science changes the landscape by which we communicate. Things like social media and increasing isolation often come to mind.
  3. When younger relatives or friends hear the term computer science, what do you think comes to their minds?
    • I think when the term “computer science” comes up, younger relatives tend to think of people like Bill Gates and Steve Jobs, complicated algorithms and hours spent writing and rewriting computer code. The term may also invoke a sense of reclusiveness about those that study / are interested in it.

Before reading the Janovy chapter (on your honor), answer the following questions;

  1. When you hear the term biology, what comes to mind?
    • When I think of the term biology, I immediately think of the scientific method. Making observations of the outside world and attempting to recreate or learn something about them, sharing that information with others and fostering a community of learning is what I think of when I hear biology.
  2. Do you consider yourself a biologist? why or why not?
    • In a broad sense of the word, yes. I think a biologist is one who studies aspects of life sciences and attempts to synthesize new ideas from studies or observations that aren’t necessarily given to them. While I may not have a doctorate or even an undergraduate degree yet, I think I have proven that I can take information and study it in a way that I can and have presented to the larger body of the scientific community.

After reading the Denning articles and the Janovy chapter, answer the following questions:

  1. What was the purpose of these readings?
    • I think the purpose of these readings is perhaps to expose us to two fields that at first glance might appear esoteric and not obviously intertwined.The two fields are however quite compatible and by using the two in conjunction we are able to get a more comprehensive picture than we would have if the fields were mutually exclusive.
  2. Which of the voices in the Voices of Computing article seem to appeal to you the most?
    • For me, the voice of the scientist seems to appeal the most. The style of thinking, perhaps because I’ve been exposed to it the most is very engaging and requires you to both have a strong understanding and an active imagination. The community aspect of the scientist also appeals to me, as I believe that science is a large body of intellectuals with different skill sets all collaborating to push the species forward.
  3. Apply one of the seven principles from the Computing is a Natural Science article to something as "non-computer-science"-y as possible, either from other subjects or your daily life.
    • From the principles in the given reading, I chose automation and applied it to sports, more specifically basketball. The game’s objective is to score in the opposite hoop, but other than that we are given little to no direction. Automation comes in an understanding that certain patterns inevitably arise with the flow of the game, and exposing these patterns of movement toward the basket is the key to winning.
  4. What did you find most interesting or provocative about the Janovy reading?
    • I found Janovy’s statement that a biologist studies the “nature” of life to be very interesting because of his next conclusion. That is that, unlike many professions that we think of, biologists are not focussed on ideas that are restricted to the human species, because they view mankind as just another player in this vast competition for resources. I found this statement interesting because I feel that we as humans so often forget how recently we came to exist on this planet relative to other life and we often forget there are thinking living creatures all around us that are not human.
  5. What does it mean to be a biologist? Do you consider yourself a biologist? Why or why not?
    • A biologist is someone who is able to observe the world around them and use tools given to come up with their own original thoughts on how life is intertwined. These tools help to study and answer questions, then share their results with others who have similar goals. Based on this description, I would consider myself a biologist, and while I may not have all the tools or knowledge that older more experienced biologists have, I am just as much driven by a desire to answer questions about the world around me.
Personal tools