User:Maureen McKeague

From OpenWetWare

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 2: Line 2:
[[Image:OWWEmblem.png|thumb|right|Maureen McKeague (an artistic interpretation)]]
[[Image:OWWEmblem.png|thumb|right|Maureen McKeague (an artistic interpretation)]]
<br>'''Maureen McKeague'''
<br>'''Maureen McKeague'''
-
<br>[http://www.stanford.edu/ Stanford University],http://openwetware.org/wiki/Smolke_Lab/ Smolke Laboratory]
+
<br>[http://www.stanford.edu/ Stanford University]
-
<br>1125 Colonel By Drive
+
<br>Y2E2 Building
-
<br>Ottawa, ON, Canada
+
<br>473 Via Ortega
 +
<br>Stanford, CA 94305
<br>[[Special:Emailuser/Maureen McKeague|Email me through OpenWetWare]]
<br>[[Special:Emailuser/Maureen McKeague|Email me through OpenWetWare]]
-
I work in the [[DeRosa]] lab at Carleton University. 
+
I work in the [[Smolke]] lab  
==Education==
==Education==

Revision as of 19:37, 2 September 2012

Contents

Contact Info

Maureen McKeague (an artistic interpretation)
Maureen McKeague (an artistic interpretation)


Maureen McKeague
Stanford University
Y2E2 Building
473 Via Ortega
Stanford, CA 94305
Email me through OpenWetWare

I work in the Smolke lab

Education

Research interests

My PhD research involves improving the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by Exponential enrichment (SELEX) process using a combination of experimental and computational methods. I am also applying the improved SELEX technique to produce aptamers that can recognize and bind to mycotoxins (fungal metabolites) with high affinity. It is estimated that at least 25% of the grain produced worldwide is contaminated with mycotoxins. In Canada, three mycotoxins of major concern include fumonisin B1 (FB1), deoxynivalenol (DON) and ochratoxin A (OA). Mycotoxin exposure leads to a variety of pathologies including vomiting (DON); kidney disease (OA, FB1); neurological disorders (FB1); disease of the lung and liver (FB1); cancer (OA, FB1) and death (FB1, OA). While traditional food safety testing techniques to detect mycotoxins exist; there is a need for more rapid and cost-effective approaches. We expect that the relatively new technology of aptamers is a viable alternative for use in food testing, specifically for mycotoxin detection.

Publications

  1. Cruz-Toledo, J.; McKeague, M.; Zhang, X.; Giamberardino, A.; McConnell, E.; Francis, T.; DeRosa, M.C.; Dumontier, M. Aptamer Base: A collaborative knowledge base to describe aptamers and SELEX experiments. Database: Journal of Biological Databases and Curation. 2012.
  2. McKeague, M.; Giamberardino, A.; DeRosa, M.C. Advances in Aptamer-Based Biosensors for Food Safety, Environmental Biosensors. 2011, Vernon Somerset (Ed.) ISBN: 9789533074863, InTech.
  3. De Girolamo, A.; McKeague, M.; Miller, J.D.; DeRosa, M.C.; Visconti, A. Determination of Ochratoxin A in Wheat After Clean-Up through a DNA Aptamer-Based Solid Phase Extraction Column. Food Chem. 2011, 127, 1378-1384.
  4. McKeague, M.; Bradley, C.R.; De Girolamo, A.; Visconti, A.; Miller, J.D.; Derosa, M.C. Screening and Initial Binding Assessment of Fumonisin B(1) Aptamers. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2010, 11, 4864-4881.
  5. Luo, X.; McKeague, M.; Pitre, S.; Dumontier, M.; Green, J.; Golshani, A.; Derosa, M.C.; Dehne, F. Computational Approaches Toward the Design of Pools for the in Vitro Selection of Complex Aptamers. RNA. 2010, 16, 2252-2262.

Useful links

Personal tools