Biomod/2013/NanoUANL/Background

From OpenWetWare

(Difference between revisions)
Jump to: navigation, search
Line 1: Line 1:
{{Template:Nanouanl}}
{{Template:Nanouanl}}
-
 
+
<html>
-
==Background==
+
<head>
-
 
+
<title></title>
-
===Reactions in containers===
+
</head>
-
The frontiers of science are being pushed in the form of measurement of chemical systems in small spaces. This is very important as many small-space situations exist in nature, specifically within cells. Understanding these reactions is essential for comparison with biological systems, as they carry out their tasks in spaces with incredibly small volume.  
+
<body>
-
 
+
<p style="text-align: center;">
-
The study of the kinetics of chemical reactions in confined spaces has received relatively little attention. Most of the studies reported in literature describe simple reactions in liposome membranes. However, the use of containers with more mechanical stability allow a greater variety of reactions to take place.
+
<strong><span style="font-size:24px;"><span style="font-family: tahoma,geneva,sans-serif;">BACKGROUND</span></span></strong></p>
-
 
+
<p>
-
Simulation based on Brownian diffusion models including a single enzyme and substrate molecule confined in a vesicle shows that the collision frequencies between
+
<span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: lucida sans unicode,lucida grande,sans-serif;"><strong><img alt="" src="http://openwetware.org/images/9/97/UANLBackground1.jpg" style="width: 635px; height: 401px; float: center;" /></strong></span></span></p>
-
the molecules, as well as the collision frequency between the molecule and the wall depend strongly on the size of the vesicle. [ref 16 tesis block copolymer] Therefore, the biochemical reactivity of the encapsulated molecules may be affected by interactions with the container surface and confinement of the containers.
+
-
 
+
<p>
-
Finally, from an application point of view, studies of the reaction kinetics in restricted or confined spaces can help in designing new nanosystems to carry out efficient catalytic processes. [ref 18-20 tesis block copolymer].
+
<span style="font-size:14px;"><span style="font-family: trebuchet ms,helvetica,sans-serif;"><strong>Reactions in Containers</strong></span></span></p>
-
 
+
<p>
-
===HRP encapsulation===
+
<span style="font-family:trebuchet ms,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Nanocontainer is a term used for structures with a size within the nanometer range (1-100 nm). The interest in their use stems from their empty inner cavities that can be used for a variety of applications. Among these, one of peculiar interest is the encapsulation of molecules in order to turn the structure into a reaction vessel.</span></span></p>
-
Comellas-Aragonès et al (2007) reported the encapsulation and enzymatic activity of the enzyme HRP into the interior of CCMV. Taking advantage of the capsid reversible autoassembly mechanism, the enzyme was introduced inside the structure.  
+
<p>
-
 
+
<span style="font-family:trebuchet ms,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">Biological systems have always been an inspiration because of their complexity and diversity. &nbsp;Cell processes take place within constrained spaces and small volumes, and many are not yet fully understood. Advances in nanoscale fabrication have allowed us to mimic some of these spaces and features with other structures. The volumes that are present at this level (atto and zeptoliter) allow molecules to collide more often, as opposed to an &ldquo;open space&rdquo;; simulations based on Brownian diffusion have shown that collision frequency between molecules strongly depend on vesicle size.</span></span></p>
-
The enzymatic conversion of dihydrorhodamine 6G (s) to rhodamine 6G allowed 
+
<p>
-
 
+
<span style="font-family:trebuchet ms,helvetica,sans-serif;"><span style="font-size: 12px;">The most widely studied containers are liposomes: self-assembling structures formed by a lipid bilayer, that have been used to encapsulate enzymes for a variety of applications. &nbsp;However, other biological systems have also been subject of study, such as block copolymer vesicles, proteins like ferritin, and viral capsids.</span></span></p>
-
===NP synthesis in containers===
+
</body>
 +
</html>

Revision as of 14:35, 26 October 2013

UANL_Banner2.png

BACKGROUND

Reactions in Containers

Nanocontainer is a term used for structures with a size within the nanometer range (1-100 nm). The interest in their use stems from their empty inner cavities that can be used for a variety of applications. Among these, one of peculiar interest is the encapsulation of molecules in order to turn the structure into a reaction vessel.

Biological systems have always been an inspiration because of their complexity and diversity.  Cell processes take place within constrained spaces and small volumes, and many are not yet fully understood. Advances in nanoscale fabrication have allowed us to mimic some of these spaces and features with other structures. The volumes that are present at this level (atto and zeptoliter) allow molecules to collide more often, as opposed to an “open space”; simulations based on Brownian diffusion have shown that collision frequency between molecules strongly depend on vesicle size.

The most widely studied containers are liposomes: self-assembling structures formed by a lipid bilayer, that have been used to encapsulate enzymes for a variety of applications.  However, other biological systems have also been subject of study, such as block copolymer vesicles, proteins like ferritin, and viral capsids.

Personal tools