1 normal acid or base (1N)

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* 1 M (mol/l) = ''2'' N for an acid that releases 2 protons*, e.g. H<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub> (*diprotic)
* 1 M (mol/l) = ''2'' N for an acid that releases 2 protons*, e.g. H<sub>2</sub>SO<sub>4</sub> (*diprotic)
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By the way, ''molarity M'' is also a non-standard unit[http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/checklist.html]. Expressing this explicitly as mol/L or mol/m<sup>3</sup> is clearer to reader less used to biological customs.
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By the way, ''molarity M'' is also a non-standard unit[http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/checklist.html]. Expressing this explicitly as mol/L or mol/m<sup>3</sup> is clearer to readers less versed in current biological customs.
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==See also==
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* [http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Concentration#Normality Normality section of Concentration page at the Wikipedia]
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* [http://physics.nist.gov/cuu/Units/units.html International standard units, SI units]

Revision as of 11:28, 8 December 2010

Biologists are sometimes confused by the non-standard[1] chemical unit of normality N. N refers in general to salts while it's most commonly used in the context of acid and bases.

  • 1 M (mol/l) = 1 N for an acid that releases 1 proton* when dissolved in water, e.g. HCL (*monoprotic)
  • 1 M (mol/l) = 2 N for an acid that releases 2 protons*, e.g. H2SO4 (*diprotic)

By the way, molarity M is also a non-standard unit[2]. Expressing this explicitly as mol/L or mol/m3 is clearer to readers less versed in current biological customs.

See also

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